Route of the week: Chris Opie’s Cornish 200 km

OpieAs official mapping partner for the 2014 Friends Life Tour of Britain we’re thrilled to be supporting the race and will be at the Liverpool, Brighton and London stages if you want to pop by and see us. We’re also extremely excited to be able to bring you a series of recommended rides from the Rapha Condor JLT team. Ranging from 100–200km, from Skipton to Bodmin, there should be routes to suit many cyclists.

Download the GPX file

Chris Opie is one of the fastest finishing riders in the UK, and he is also the most South Westerly located rider in the domestic peloton. Haling from Truro in Cornwall, where he lives with his partner and son, Opie no doubt has the longest commute of anyone to get to races in the UK, but the 27 year-old is happy to spend the extra time travelling to races if it means that he can train on his home roads in Cornwall. Continue reading “Route of the week: Chris Opie’s Cornish 200 km”

Route of the week: Tom Moses’ Yorkshire Dales

Moses-Somerberg-3As official mapping partner for the 2014 Friends Life Tour of Britain we’re thrilled to be supporting the race and will be at the Liverpool, Brighton and London stages if you want to pop by and see us. We’re also extremely excited to be able to bring you a series of recommended rides from the Rapha Condor JLT team. Ranging from 100–200km, from Skipton to Bodmin, there should be routes to suit many cyclists.

Download the GPX file

Tom Moses has been one of Rapha Condor JLT’s top performers in 2014, scoring some impressive results in the spring, including a memorable stage win in diabolical conditions at the Tour of Normandy in France, where he held the yellow jersey for a number of days. Continue reading “Route of the week: Tom Moses’ Yorkshire Dales”

Route of the week: Richard Handley’s Clieves Hill and Southport loop

Handley-prime-3As official mapping partner for the 2014 Friends Life Tour of Britain we’re thrilled to be supporting the race and will be at the Liverpool, Brighton and London stages if you want to pop by and see us. We’re also extremely excited to be able to bring you a series of recommended rides from the Rapha Condor JLT team. Ranging from 100–200km, from Skipton to Bodmin, there should be routes to suit many cyclists.

Download the GPX file

Richard Handley is one of the key players in the tightly knit Rapha Condor JLT team. Handley is widely regarded as one of the most calculating and intelligent riders in the bunch, and he has been instrumental in the success of others in the team over the past three years, as well as scoring some notable successes of his own – most recently at the Ryedale GP in Yorkshire. Continue reading “Route of the week: Richard Handley’s Clieves Hill and Southport loop”

Putting Coronation Street on the map

Coronation Street surveyor - main shotOur surveyors roam the length and breadth of the country, but it’s not every day that they get to visit Britain’s most famous cobbled street. We’re always talking about making 10,000 changes a day to the master map of Great Britain and keeping the 460 million features in our database up-to-date – and our latest changes include the new set of Coronation Street!

The new map follows the recent move of the Coronation Street lot from ITV’s Quay Street studios to its new purpose built state-of-the-art home in Trafford. With updates ranging from changes in kerb lines to the addition of new roads, houses and retail properties, it’s not surprising to see the Street being captured in our most detailed mapping, OS MasterMap. Continue reading “Putting Coronation Street on the map”

Summer interns get to grips with OS OpenSpace and open data

Each year we recruit a number of paid interns to come and work with various teams around our business over the summer period. This year, four of our interns went to work in our Research team and were tasked with investigating how maps could bring data to life. They each set up an OS OpenSpace map on a website, using some of the wealth of open data out there to overlay on the maps and give users a new map experience.

This week, find out how Peter and Katie got on. Next week, we’ll show you the results of Fred and Caroline’s labours. The maps are currently hosted internally using a test API, so we can’t share them with you, but we’ve used screen shots to illustrate the story.

Katie Johnson from University of Sheffield

“This summer, I’ve been lucky enough to undertake a 10-week internship with Ordnance Survey (OS), working in the research department. As my internship draws to a close, I am finally adding the finishing touches to my project. The aim of the project was ultimately to use OS data as the context for third-party data (data enrichment), therefore using OS as an enabler. To do this, I created an interactive online interface using OS OpenSpace and third-party data.

interns-1

Continue reading “Summer interns get to grips with OS OpenSpace and open data”

Walk of the week: Scenic Windermere walk and boat tour

Today’s walk is a guest blog from Digital Outdoors, a network of over 60 camping and outdoor holiday websites. Their mission is to connect UK campers with great campsites and inspire and nurture a love for the Great British Outdoors.

Length of route: 3.1 m
Starting point: SD 413 987
Suitable for: Walking
Maps: OS Explorer Map OL7 The English Lakes: South-Eastern area
Download our OS MapFinder app and record your route
Use OS getamap

windermere-walk

Continue reading “Walk of the week: Scenic Windermere walk and boat tour”

British geology added to Ordnance Survey Minecraft map

It’s almost a year since one of summer interns, Joseph Braybook, built a Minecraft world using OS OpenData products, representing over 224,000 square kilometers of Great Britain and we made it available for you to download and explore. We’ve seen around 170,000 downloads since last September, and it seems particularly fitting, that as the one year anniversary draws near, the British Geological Survey (BGS) have gone one step further and recreated the geology of Great Britain beneath the surface. 

Drawing on inspiration from our map last year, the new BGS Minecraft map uses our surface data and adds in their own information on the rough position of real geology beneath, right down to the bedrock. BGS produced the Minecraft blocks using data from their parent material map. In the UK, parent materials provide the basic foundations and building blocks of the soil, influencing their texture, structure, drainage and chemistry.

By peeling away the surface OS map, BGS show the underlying geology beneath the Isle of Wight.

By peeling away the surface OS map, BGS show the underlying geology beneath the Isle of Wight.

Continue reading “British geology added to Ordnance Survey Minecraft map”

Could you find your way using a map and a compass?

We said a couple of weeks ago that we had wildlife and outdoors expert Simon King in our Southampton head office being interviewed on numerous radio stations about the importance of navigation and knowing where you are. Simon also filmed a short video for us that day. Filmed in the glorious New Forest, Simon and the camera crew interviewed a number of visitors to find out their navigation skills, before reminding us of the basics.

Watch the video below:

Continue reading “Could you find your way using a map and a compass?”

Putting Doctor Who’s Tardis on the map

Tomorrow night will see the much-anticipated return of Doctor Who on our TV screens, with the new Doctor played by Peter Capaldi. We’ll be pleased to see the Tardis back on our screens because of its connection to our maps. As you may know know, the real-life function of those boxes that the Tardis has adopted, was as a telephone call box connecting you to your local police station.

Doctor Who Tardis map


In the early 20th century, hundreds of police call boxes (PCBs) sat on street corners waiting to be used. As phone boxes became more common place (first the famous red design and now the more modern glass version) and then home phones and mobiles phones took over, the PCBs fell out of use.

However, many of them still exist around the country – and for those in their original locations, they are still on our mapping data. Some 203 PCBs are still marked on our maps, although only a fraction of those are recognisable as the Tardis that we still know and love today.  Continue reading “Putting Doctor Who’s Tardis on the map”

Where is the centre of Great Britain?

Is Haltwhistle the centre of Britain?

Is Haltwhistle the centre of Britain?

One of the most common questions we are asked in Ordnance Survey’s Press Office is ‘where is the geographic centre of Britain?’ Most recently, the BBC got in contact with us, framing their article around the question of Scottish Independence and the effect that would have on the centre of Great Britain. The question continues to bubble up as it always has been a contentious issue with many differing views on locations – and even how you define the centre, define Great Britain, and how you measure it.

As you’ll see in the BBC article, the town of Haltwhistle in Northumberland proudly proclaims itself to be the centre of Great Britain as it is mid-way along the mainland’s longest line of longitude; and there is a stone cross in Meriden, near Coventry, claiming to be the geographical centre of England. Some people claim the point farthest from the sea must be the centre (a spot just east of Church Flatts Farm, about a mile south-east of Coton-in-the-Elms, Derbyshire), but others don’t think this can accurately be called the centre…so, where is the centre of Great Britain? Continue reading “Where is the centre of Great Britain?”