Walk of the week: Ennerdale Water

Today’s walk is from Peter Naldrett, author of the Trigpoint Walks series of books, and now the Lake District Dog Walker’s Guide.

Length of route: 7 miles
Starting point: NY 085 153
Suitable for: Walking
Where to park: There is a free car park at Bleach Green car park, Ennerdale.
Maps: OS Explorer Map OL4 The English Lakes: North-Western Area
Download our OS MapFinder app and record your route
Use OS getamap
Download the GPX file

ennerdale-water-peter-naldrett

Dog factors
Road walking: None.
Livestock: A sensible approach is required and dogs should be kept under control as sheep may be encountered during this walk at the base of several fells.
Stiles: None.
Nearest vets: West Lakeland Veterinary Group, St Bridgets Lane, Egremont, CA22 2BB. Tel: 01946 820312 www.westlakelandvets.co.uk
Nearby dog friendly pubs: The Fox and Hounds at Ennerdale Bridge is the nearest pub and is a lovely place to relax after a walk around this wonderful lake. The pub was bought by villagers in 2011 and the owners welcome walkers with muddy boots and dogs. Tel: 01946 861181 www.foxandhoundsinn.org Postcode: CA23 3AR Meanwhile, The Brook Inn at Cleator is a small terraced pub a little further away with a warm welcome for dog owners. Tel: 01946 811635 Postcode: CA23 3DX. Continue reading “Walk of the week: Ennerdale Water”

A guide to Scafell Pike

Today’s guest blog comes from Doug Belchamber at scafellpike.org.uk – the website that provides a complete guide to England’s highest peak.

scafell pike viewPush yourself to your limit by conquering one of the greatest challenges in England – Scafell Pike! As England’s highest mountain – standing at 978 metres, this is a brilliant way of challenging yourself to beat your personal best. Located in the stunning Lake District National Park, Scafell Pike is steeped in beauty and history, and offers a fantastic experience for climbers of all ages. Continue reading “A guide to Scafell Pike”

Walk of the week – Hartsop

A guest post by Ordnance Survey’s Gwyn Hughes-Jones

This is a great walk to do on a crisp spring day. It has fantastic views over the Eastern Fells of the Lake District.  This walk is on Explorer map OL6 – The English Lakes North Eastern Area.

The walk starts at Hartsop, a small hamlet in the Patterdale Valley. There is plenty of parking available at Cow Bridge, a short 600m from Hartsop. To start the walk you go through Hartsop and take the right hand fork: this is signposted as a Bridleway up High Street. Stay on the left hand side of the river and follow the path as it starts to climb gently up towards Hayeswater. After 600 metres, cross the river and follow the path around the bottom of Gray Crag. After a kilometre you cross the river again just before reaching Hayeswater.

Once over the river, the path starts to zig zag slightly as you gain height.  The cairn on the Knott can be seen after about a kilometre of easy climbing. This is a great place to stop and appreciate the view towards Hartsop. There is a handy stone wall providing shelter (if required) and a place to rest your flask of tea.

Continue reading “Walk of the week – Hartsop”

A walk around Grasmere and Elterwater

The Lake District is a beautiful area and there are countless different walks to follow to suit walkers of all abilities. When I was there last year, on an unseasonably warm and sunny March weekend, I had a lovely 6-mile walk around Grasmere and Elterwater that I’d like to share with you. There are some spectacular views from high above Grasmere and you also pass a pub or two along the way. You’ll need OS Explorer Map OL7 The English Lakes South-eastern area.

The starting point is Grasmere, a beautiful village to have a stroll round beforehand, or to enjoy a cream tea in afterwards. It was once home to the poet William Wordsworth and you can visit two of his former homes and see the Wordsworth family graves at St Oswalds Church.

The church is the starting point for the walk. With St Oswalds on your right, head along the road, taking the first left onto a small lane. You’ll pass the garden centre car park and should follow the lane for around three quarters of a mile. There are some lovely views over Grasmere as you follow the lane.

Continue reading “A walk around Grasmere and Elterwater”

Welcome to January!

Start the new year with a fantastic on screen wallpaper showing the beautiful Walna Scar in the Lake District – look at it daily on your desktop or mobile phone and feel inspired to start planning your next outdoors adventure in the popular Lake District.

Walna Scar is a restricted byway which can only be used by walkers, horse riders, cyclists and pony and traps. This decision was reached in January 2011 after a protracted discussion about whether access to motor vehicles should be allowed. Looking at this image, I wouldn’t been keen to drive over it!

It is located on OL6 – The English Lakes – South Western area near to Coniston Water where Donald Campbell broke the water speed record in 1955, and was killed attempting to regain it again in 1967. The nearby Ruskin Museum has more information about him, although the Bluebird café on the lake is clearly a lasting reminder of him and visitors can take a variety of boats out onto the lake – although they won’t be likely to achieve the speeds he did!

Continue reading “Welcome to January!”

Looking ahead to the Kendal Mountain Festival

The days are getting shorter and the weather is certainly getting colder but these are not reasons to stop celebrating all that it great about the outdoors. Later this month is the annual Kendal Mountain Festival and today on the Ordnance Survey blog I thought we’d have a look at what is planned.

Running from 17 to 20 November, the Kendal Mountain Festival is one of the largest and most varied outdoor festivals in Europe. It brings together a varied programme of films, lectures and parties with some fantastic names from the outdoors present including Andy Kirkpatrick, Cameron McNeish and Kenton Cool.

The centre point of the festival is the Kendal Mountain Film Festival where over 50 films are screened (from over 200 entries). They are all hoping to be able to walk away with one of the ten awards that are up for offer. Who will win??

The festival really does seem to have something for everyone – no matter what your activity of choice is to enjoy the outdoors. There’s a bike night, snow sports, climbing and endurance sports events to whet the appetite for your own future adventures.

If you’re headed to the festival and planning to go walking – don’t forget your Ordnance Survey maps. You can also plan your trip on OS getamap before you go.

Are you heading for Kendal for the festival? What are you looking forward to the most?

After the floods – putting Cumbria back together

For the last in our series of posts this week celebrating the Lake District National Park we’re looking at how Cumbria is returning to normal after the floods of November 2009.

The day of 19 November 2009 will remain in the memories of those living in Cumbria, and in particular Cockermouth for some time to come. Heavy rains had caused the rivers Derwent and Cocker, which both meet in Cockermouth, to rise and burst their banks. It was the time it took for the waters to take over the town that caught many unawares and unprepared. By midday the water levels were high, but Main Street was dry, by 3pm the water was a foot deep on Main Street and by midnight Main Street and some of it’s side streets had been transformed into a raging torrent of water which reached up to 8ft deep in places. I’d watched the footage on the television and thought that it looked bad – but it wasn’t until I visited Cockermouth earlier this year that I realised just how bad it had been.

Many bridges, like this one at Little Braithwaite, were destroyed during the floods.

Many bridges, like this one at Little Braithwaite, were destroyed during the floods.

Cockermouth wasn’t the only place affected by the floods. Workington, at the mouth of the River Derwent, was also badly affected with flood water. Being down stream from where the two flooded rivers met in Cockermouth, the flood waters came rushing downstream and engulfed Workington. The wall of water took out several bridges in the town – leaving only the railway bridge left as the river crossing, effectively cutting the town in two. Continue reading “After the floods – putting Cumbria back together”

Walk of the week – Ullscarf

As this is the week that we’re celebrating all things Lake District – the walk of the week had to be a Lake District one! We have Car Free Walks to thank for this walk.

Our walk today is up Ullscarf

Our walk today is up Ullscarf

For a hill right in the centre of the Lake District, Ullscarf is a bit overlooked – rarely on people’s ‘must do’ lists, and seldom highlighted in walking guidebooks.

Maybe it’s down to trouble with the neighbours. Ullscarf sits in one of the Lakes’ more high-end districts, with Helvellyn, Great Gable, St Sunday’s and Fairfield all nearby and drawing the crowds. But despite Ullscarf’s modest height (726m) and lack of rocky scrambles, this is a fantastic hill with much to offer, not least the stunning views of those well-heeled neighbours. Add it to your ‘must do’ list.

A good way to tackle the hill is via a linear walk from Grasmere to Rosthwaite in Borrowdale – Ullscarf lies in between the two villages. Plan to do the walk car-free – both villages have regular buses to and from Keswick, making the logistics of a linear walk simple. And taking the bus avoids the nightmare that is trying to park in the Lakes in summer.

Distance: 16km / 10 miles
Time: allow 4-5 hours
Public transport: the 555 bus calls at Grasmere; number 78 stops at Rosthwaite on its way to Keswick.
Ordnance Survey Map: OS Explorer Map OL4 and OS Explorer Map OL7: The English Lakes, North-western area and South- eastern area
Starting point: Grasmere village – OS grid reference NY336075

  1. From Grasmere, walk along Easedale Road heading northwest out of the village (there is a footpath along most of the road). At the end, take the footpath signposted to Far Easedale Gill.
  2. The bridleway leads up on to Grasmere Common. Keep heading uphill until you reach the flatter land at Greenup Edge, in the valley between High Raise and Ullscarf.
  3. A line of rusty fence posts points the way to Ullscarf, climbing steadily up the hill’s southern shoulder.
  4. Enjoy the wonderful views at the summit and see how many of the surrounding peaks you can name.

    How many of the surrounding peaks can you name?

    How many of the surrounding peaks can you name?

  5. From the summit, head north over Coldbarrow Fell to join the bridleway that runs west–east, passing Blea Tarn.

    Follow the footpath to Watendlath

    Follow the footpath to Watendlath

  6. Follow this bridleway to Watendlath. From here, drop down via the excellently named Puddingstone Bank into Rosthwaite village. Stop for a drink in the Scafell Hotel before catching the bus home.

Have you walked Ullscarf? Where is your favourite walk in the Lake District?

If you’re going walking in the Lake District – don’t forget to take your Ordnance Survey maps with you!


Lake District National Park – relying on geography

This week we're celebrating 60 years of the Lake District National Park.

This week we’re celebrating 60 years of the Lake District National Park.

This week we’re celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Lake District National Park. Today we’re looking at the national park authority and how they rely on Ordnance Survey mapping data. Today we’re talking to Rosemary Long who is a GIS Officer for the Lake District National Park (LDNP). Rosemary has worked for LDNP for over ten years but has been in her current role since March 2011.

What’s a typical day like for you Rosemary?
No two days here are ever the same in the GIS team. The one constant thing that we have to deal with though is location. When we need to show someone where something is in the Lake District the best way is to show them on a map – and the best maps of the Lake District are Ordnance Survey ones. Continue reading “Lake District National Park – relying on geography”