Jump to the following:

We use cookies to improve this website. Read about cookies

Old maps and public footpaths

Request for Information – FOI14561

Request

Thank you for your letter and copies of the maps we received on 16 June 2015 requesting information from Ordnance Survey in accordance with the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) 2000.

Using the Freedom of Information Act 2000 I would appreciate your help regarding the questions I have listed below.

1. How often were new editions/versions of OS Maps printed/published? Example every year, every two years. I would be grateful if you could list them in years, in date order starting from 1910 to 1958 and from 1958 to the present date please.

2. Please could you inform me of the year and relevant date the first public rights of way survey started as aforementioned, the first right of way completed in the Nottinghamshire area?

3. Could you please inform me if I enquired and found out about public footpaths in the Nottinghamshire area, date from 1949 to 1951, where would I have been able to obtain this information from, would the information be shown on the Ordnance Survey maps? Whilst researching and viewing different dated OS maps I noticed that as the Base of the footnote on the Ordnance Survey Maps. (N.B. The representation on this map of a road track or footpath is no evidence of a right of way). Was this printed on all maps.

4. If this was not possible at the above date 1949-1955 to gain the information on the historic Ordnance maps, how would a person be able to acquire or gain this information, w[h]ere and how would this information be assessed or obtained from within the aforementioned years?

5. Could you please inform me what year did the Ordnance start to depict the purple and unique path numbers on to their Ordnance [Survey] maps?

6. Could you please inform me of where I can view all the OS Maps that track the actual Rights of Way be viewed in one place in England, which includes their dates of entry regarding the Nottinghamshire area?

7. Could you please inform me where I may obtain information regarding the key to unlocking the information contained within a tithe map and within the quarter section 1841 to 1846 volume 12 that correlate with each other that is enclosed.

The People at the Nottingham Archive, National Archives Kew, Main Library in London, cannot help with unlocking the information I require from the aforementioned book and map. The tithe map enclosed depicts the roads on colour, a sandy colour, and within the field boundaries depicts another colour an orange-ish colour that I have highlighted on one side of the road. Some fields depict T symbols, which indicate the owner of the fence/hedge.

The aforementioned book informs King Edward IV at the time made it compulsory to dig a ditch/dyke within the enclosures, could this be it? Or could it be access to the field enclosure?

An extract from the Nottinghamshire enrolment 1841 to 1846, states that Middlefield road is *Awarded and is *** private carriage drift and occupation road.

**Awarded for the use of the owners and occupiers of the allotments adjoining thereto. If the field enclosures of lands are adjoining one side of the road and the other side of the road has a dyke/ditch, are the lands on the ditch side classed as adjoining the road? OS Maps has a key, the tithe maps are as written.

I believe that the historic maps are/were stored in the Tower of London, does anybody know or have the knowledge within Ordnance Survey organisation? Hope you don’t mind me enquiring your people have a connection with maps, do not know who else to ask. Would a professor at a map university know?

I would be grateful of any input/assistance.

Our response

Responding to the specific questions that you have posed I can confirm the following:

1. Without knowing the specific OS map or maps you are interested in it is impossible for us to accurately answer this question. If you wish to provide further clarification as to which OS Maps you are referring we may be able to answer this question in more detail. However under Section 16 of the FOIA ‘the duty to provide advice and assistance’ we can provide the following information which may assist you in this matter.

Ordnance Survey has historically published maps for a wide variety of uses at a range of scales. Ordnance Survey currently publishes maps on a regular basis, with publication cycles ranging from once every 12 months to once every six weeks. Under Section 21 (information accessible via other means), we believe that the information you request may be available from one of the companies, such as Old Maps (www.old-maps.co.uk), who provide access to historic Ordnance Survey mapping.

2. Ordnance Survey does not hold this information. However, under Section 16 of the FOIA ‘the duty to provide advice and assistance’ we can provide the following information which may assist you in this matter. Our records show that the original rights of way survey in Nottinghamshire was split into seven districts and the only information still held is for districts six and seven which were dated, 21 May 1957 and 9 April 1957 respectively. Under Section 21 (information Accessible via other means), we believe that this information may be available from the Nottinghamshire Rights of Way team.

3.
a) Ordnance Survey does not hold this information. However under Section 16 of the FOIA ‘the duty to provide advice and assistance’ we can provide the following information which may assist you in this matter. We did not receive from Nottinghamshire County Council the first District of the Nottinghamshire Definitive Map until August 1960, so we would not have shown any rights of way on our mapping in the Nottinghamshire area before that date. Under Section 21 (information Accessible via other means), we believe that this information may be available from the Nottinghamshire Rights of Way team.

b) Ordnance Survey does not hold this information. However, under Section 16 of the FOIA ‘the duty to provide advice and assistance’ we can provide the following information which may assist you in this matter. Ordnance Survey has added the footnote, or similar wording, in the border of its Explorer and Landranger mapping in recent years, but is unable to determine what date this note first appeared on our mapping.

4. Ordnance Survey does not hold this information. However under Section 16 of the FOIA ‘the duty to provide advice and assistance’ we can provide the following information which may assist you in this matter. We did not receive the first District of the Nottinghamshire Definitive Map from Nottinghamshire County Council until August 1960, so we would not have shown any rights of way on our mapping in the Nottinghamshire area before that date. Under Section 21 (information Accessible via other means), we believe that this information may be available from the Nottinghamshire Rights of Way team.

5. Ordnance Survey does not hold this information. However under Section 16 of the FOIA ‘the duty to provide advice and assistance’ we can provide the following information which may assist you in this matter. Ordnance Survey has never added purple or unique path numbers to its mapping. It is possible that the map you are referring to is the Nottinghamshire Definitive Map, which uses OS mapping as a base map, on which Nottinghamshire County Council has added the rights of way information and their unique path numbers. Under Section 21 (information Accessible via other means), we believe that this information may be available from the Nottinghamshire Rights of Way team.

6. Ordnance Survey does not hold this information. However under Section 16 of the FOIA ‘the duty to provide advice and assistance’ we can provide the following information which may assist you in this matter. All of the historical Definitive Maps that Ordnance Survey held, which may or may not include the dates of entry, including those for Nottinghamshire, were deposited in 2010 at the National Archives in Kew where they can now be viewed. Ordnance Survey no longer retains any historical Definitive Maps.

7. Ordnance Survey does not hold this information. However under Section 21 (information Accessible via other means), we believe that this information may be available from the Nottingham County Archive, the National Archives Kew or the British [Main] Library in London.

Internal review

Your enquiry has been processed according to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) 2000. If you are unhappy with our response, you may request an internal review with our FOI Internal Review Officer, by contacting them as follows:

FOI Internal Review Officer
Customer Service Centre
Ordnance Survey
Adanac Drive
Southampton
SO16 0AS

Email: foi@os.uk

Please include the reference number above. You may request an internal review where you believe Ordnance Survey has:

  • Failed to respond to your request within the time limits (normally 20 working days)
  • Failed to tell you whether or not we hold the information
  • Failed to provide the information you have requested
  • Failed to explain the reasons for refusing a request
  • Failed to correctly apply an exemption or exception

The FOI Internal Review Officer will not have been involved in the original decision. They will conduct an independent internal review and will inform you of the outcome of the review normally within 20 working days, but exceptionally within 40 working days, in line with the Information Commissioner’s guidance.

The FOI Internal Review Officer will either: uphold the original decision, provide an additional explanation of the exemption/s applied or release further information, if it is considered appropriate to do so.

Appeal to Information Commissioner's Office (ICO)
If, following the outcome of the internal review you remain unhappy with our response, you may raise an appeal with the Information Commissioner’s Office at:

The Case Reception Unit
Customer Service Team
The Information Commissioner’s Office
Wycliffe House
Water Lane
Wilmslow
Cheshire
SK9 5AF

Email: mail@ico.gsi.gov.uk

Telephone helpline: 0303 123 1113 or 01625 545745 for advice, Monday to Friday.

Thank you for your enquiry.

Search Freedom of Information requests

Back to top
© Ordnance Survey 2016
Be sure to take a look at our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy