16
Aug
2011

A day in the life of a surveyor in Cumbria

This week on the Ordnance Survey blog we are celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Lake District National Park. Today we are going to spend the day with Ant Kewen who is one of our Surveyors and is based in Cumbria.

 

 

 

 

Ant, how long have you been working with Ordnance Survey?
I joined Ordnance Survey back in 1985 as a Surveyor and worked in Lancashire for 23 years. I’ve been in my current role here in Cumbria for the past 3 years.

Ant doesn't have a bad view on his journey to work does he?

Ant doesn’t have a bad view on his journey to work does he?

What is a typical day like for you?
I get up before the rest of the house, have a cup of tea, and put the computer on to check through e-mails. I then decide which area of Cumbria I’m going to work in today. The decision on which jobs to do and where to go are based on high priority work such as Land Registry and high priority jobs based on age and size. I check the weather – it always seems to be raining somewhere in Cumbria but seeing as I have the whole of Cumbria to go to and a choice of jobs that can be done in the rain (such as collecting addresses or reviews), I’m not usually housebound due to the weather. I then double check that I have the data I need – when I return home I usually set this up ready for the following day, then set the SatNav up and off I go. The range of tasks in a typical day can vary from Land Registry Surveys and building sites through to single houses and barn conversions, reviewing planned jobs to assess when they will be ready to survey and collecting and matching addresses.

The timber classroom pods on stilts at Elleray Preparatory School are the most unusal thing that Ant has surveyed in the Lake District

The timber classroom pods on stilts at Elleray Preparatory School are the most unusual thing that Ant has surveyed in the Lake District

What’s the most unusual thing that you’ve had to survey in the Lake District?
The most unusual thing would have to be the timber classroom pods on stilts at Elleray Preparatory School in the Lake District National Park, Windermere.

What has been the most challenging job that you’ve worked on?
The most challenging and satisfying work I have done here is the removal and replacement from our data of the bridges that collapsed after the flooding of November 2009. This ensured that we were able to supply the most up-to-date routing information. The most significant being at Workington (outside of the National Park) and others at Little Braithwaite which is just outside Keswick and Lorton within the National Park.

The bridge at Little Braithwaite didn't survive the flooding of November 2009

The bridge at Little Braithwaite didn’t survive the flooding of November 2009

 

The new bridge at Little Braithwaite

The new bridge at Little Braithwaite

Where in the Lake District is your favourite place for leisure?
I like to go walking and exploring the quiet places that I have discovered during the course of my work.

One of many ways to destress after another hard day of work ...

One of many ways to destress after another hard day of work …

And where are your favourite locations for work?
My favourite places that I work are generally locations that I used to visit when I was on holiday. It gives me a privileged feeling that I am actually getting paid to be there! I am also happy updating maps in villages and towns such as Ambleside and Grasmere as well as remote locations in hamlets and at farms in areas that I wouldn’t usually visit.

Thank you to Ant for taking the time to take us through your working day.

Don’t forget if you go to the Lake District to make sure you take your Ordnance Survey maps with you – where you will see the detail that has been collected by Ant through the course of his work.

Tomorrow on the Ordnance Survey blog we’ll be hearing from the Lake District National Park themselves on how they use our mapping data.

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