4
May
2012
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Are you a train-station spotter? Find out in our quiz…

It’s that time of year when people are thinking about how to spend half term, or what do with themselves for the Diamond Jubilee Bank Holiday weekend. For many of us, whether we’re planning a staycation in Great Britain or heading to airports and ferry terminals for a trip abroad, we may be using the rail network to get about. Changes to train stations and the rail network form a part of the 5,000 changes a day Ordnance Survey capture as we maintain the master map of Great Britain.

We have some beautiful buildings housing train stations across the country, such as Bristol Temple Meads.  It opened on 31 August 1840 and the whole railway including Temple Meads was the first one designed by the British engineer, Isambard Kingdom Brunel. Brunel’s terminus is no longer part of the working station and its historical significance has been noted with most of the site Grade 1 listed.

Of course, not all of us are lucky enough to have such a beautiful or historic station. And even if we were, would we recognise it on a map? There are eight extracts of OS MasterMap below showing train stations across Great Britain. We’ve stripped off all the road names and labels to make you work that bit harder. Post your answers on the blog and we’ll let you know the answers later. 

42 Responses

    1. Tom

      1. Manchester Piccadilly
      2. Edinburgh Waverley
      3. London St. Pancras
      4. Bristol Temple Meads
      5. Newcastle Central
      6. Birmingham New Street
      7. Portsmouth Harbour
      8. York

  1. Adam

    Morning all, here’s what I have so far:

    1. Manchester Piccadilly
    2. Edinburgh Waverley
    3. St. Pancras (subtle disguise of King’s Cross there!)
    4.
    5.
    6. Birmingham New Street
    7. Portsmouth Harbour
    8. York

  2. 1. Manchester Piccadilly?
    2. Edinburgh Waverley
    3. St Pancras
    4. Cardiff Central
    5. Newcastle-on-Tyne?
    6. Birmingham New St
    7. Portsmouth Harbour?
    8. York?

  3. Geoff

    1 Manchester Piccadilly
    2 Edinburgh Waverley
    3 London St Pancras
    5 Newcastle
    6 Birmingham New Street
    8 York

  4. chris

    1. manchester piccadilly
    2. waverley
    3. st pancras
    4. dunno
    5. newcastle?
    6. new street
    7. portsmouth (but only coz others spotted it !)
    8. york

  5. Andrew

    1. Manchester Piccadilly
    2. Edinburgh Waverley
    3. London St Pancras
    4. Cardiff
    5. Newcastle
    6. Birmingham New Street
    7. Portsmouth Harbour
    8. York

    And please, “railway station” or just “station”, not “train station”.

  6. Dave H

    1 Manchester Piccadilly (MAN) Network Rail MS
    2 Edinburgh Waverley (EDB) Network Rail MS
    3 St Pancras International (STP) LCR (HS1) managed by Network Rail
    4 Cardiff Central (CDF) Arriva TW (TAC)
    5 Newcastle Central (NCL) East Coast Railways
    6 Birmingham New Street (BHM) Network Rail; MS
    7 Portsmouth Harbour (PMH) South West Trains
    8 York (YRK) East Coast Railways

    Now how about all the rail stations which do not have a public road (or by that reasoning will never have a car park)
    Followed by all the stations on the main UK rail network NOT owned by Network Rail (clue – they range from a single grass covered platform to a massive ‘destination’ shopping centre)

  7. Pete

    1. Manchester Piccadilly
    2. Edinburgh Waverley
    3. St Pancras
    4. Cardiff Central
    5. Newcastle
    6. Birmingham New Street
    7. Portsmouth Harbour
    8. York

    Been through all of them apart from #3 (quite obvious though) and #7 so borrowing that answer!

  8. Mariateresa

    Interesting that many stations are by rivers/waterways, even if nowadays it is not at all relevant!

    1. Rupert

      As many railways were built to compete with canal traffic they often have a close proximity, especially if that combines with the historic location of towns being on a crossing point of a River and therefore a city ‘centre’.

  9. Dave H

    Post thought – very much map-related. There is a list on ASTT (download from Network Rail website, and a London matrix for making rail connections by changing stations as well as trains. Such knowledge can cut your journey times by up to an hour (High speed 2 without the tears and massive costs!)

    Examples –

    A 6 minute bike ride, and 15-20 minute walk between Warrington Bank Quay and Warrington Central, can give you a second option for a fast journey from London, and for me cut 35 minutes from a 4 hour (official service – change at Wigan) Glasgow-Liverpool trip

    The London matrix advises allowing 35 minutes to walk down to the Tube platforms at King’s Cross/St Pancras and wait for a train to travel to Euston, and walk back up to the station. A brisk walk or a bike ride along Brill Place, and down Eversholt Street is a lot faster. I’ve got off a train at Euston and been comfortably on a train at King’s Cross 6 minutes later (avoiding a 30 minute wait for the next one)

    I directed a colleague who wanted to head to Heathrow from Euston to walk to Euston Square for the direct train to Paddington and Heathrow Express, rather than head via changing trains to St Pancras and the Piccadilly Line, or the Hammersmith & City to get to the Airport or HEx

    So many places where a short walk or bike ride could cut up to a hour from your rail journey – with immediate application, and no major cost (aside from buying a bike perhaps). It might make an interesting review in the UK – or even further afield to find out who is slashing their commuting or long distance travel times by low cost wrinkles like this – intelligent use of maps, and integration of walking and cycling transport modes.

    I know of one business traveller Preston-Gillingham (Dorset) who cuts an hour each way from his rail journey, by cycling EUS-WAT (12 minutes vice 53) – who has other examples?

    With the introduction of Brompton Dock in Manchester, more can also see the realistic and repeatable 2.5 hour office to office trips between Manchester and London sites. My own test run was from G-Mex to 55 Broadway – door to door in 2h 32m, including 4 minutes waiting for the train to leave MAN.

  10. John Murray

    1. Manchester Piccadilly
    4. Cardiff Central
    5. Newcastle Central – the underground Metro line is a giveaway
    6. Birmingham New Street
    8. York

  11. Nigel Wright

    1: Manchester Piccadilly
    2: Edinburgh Waverley
    3: London St. Pancras
    4: Cardiff Central
    5: Newcastle Central
    6: Birmingham New Street
    7: Portsmouth Harbour
    8: York

    AND THEY ARE ALL RAILWAY STATIONS, NOT TRAIN STATIONS!!!!!!!

  12. Joe Hosking

    1. Manchester Piccadilly
    2. Edinburgh Waverley
    3. London St. Pancras
    4. Cardif Central
    5. Newcastle
    6. Birmingham New Street
    7. Portsmouth Harbour
    8. York

  13. Peter R White

    Train Station vs Rail(way) Station. “Train” is correct as it is the train that is stationed (i.e. stops) there. If “Railway” is preferred then a bus station should be a Road Station and a dock should be a water station. Despite this pedantic view, railway station has become the norm and thus should be preferred!

  14. J Burr

    1. Manchester Piccadilly
    2. Edinburgh Waverley
    3. London St. Pancras
    4. Cardif Central
    5. Newcastle
    6. Birmingham New Street
    7. Portsmouth Harbour
    8. York

  15. Cyril Fidell

    The network of railways in Plymouth, Devon, England, was developed by companies affiliated to two competing railways, the Great Western Railway and the London and South Western Railway. At their height two main lines and three branch lines served 28 stations in the Plymouth area, but today just six stations remain in use. The first uses of railway in the area were wooden rails used during the construction of docks facilities. ”

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