By

Gemma

10
Jul
2019
9

OS OpenData available in Esri Living Atlas

Do you use Esri’s Living Atlas? We’re working to make OS OpenData more accessible and have added OS Open Greenspace to Esri’s collection of geospatial data.

The ArcGIS Living Atlas of the World is the foremost collection of geographic information from around the globe. It includes maps, apps, and data layers from Esri’s authoritative community and the wider GIS world.  A global audience accesses Esri’s curated set of data, which allows users to combine these multiple datasets with their own data to create new maps and applications. We’ve added OS Open Greenspace to test how the data is received and are keen for feedback from users who access it via Living Atlas.

Why was OS Open Greenspace selected?

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28
Jun
2019
0

Meet the team: Hazel Hendley

Continuing our series to introduce you to the creative individuals within OS and share the variety of work we do, meet Hazel Hendley. As Interim HR Director, and currently recruiting for a Reward Manager to join OS, Hazel gives us a glimpse into her role and the HR team…

Hazel Hendley, Interim HR Director

Tell us a bit about yourself Hazel

I have a background in Occupational Psychology and taking a strengths-based, positive approach is central to my HR philosophy. Helping business, teams and individuals meet their full potential is hugely rewarding for me.

Outside of work, I’m married and have a daughter. Both my husband and daughter are competitive triathletes and enjoy supporting their goals with good food and plenty of encouragement. In any spare moments I like spending time with friends and family and fitting the odd gym session in.

What’s been your personal highlight of working at OS?

There have been many highlights working here at OS, but one of my greatest memories was last September when the whole business participated in National Fitness Week with a day’s activity. We all got away from our desks, tried something new, got outside and had fun with our colleagues. It was a great privilege to be one of the sponsors of this.

Over the past 18 months I’ve really enjoyed building the HR team. We’re the most engaged team in OS and we’re passionate about delivering a great service to our colleagues across the business. Read More

26
Jun
2019
3

Get to grips with OS APIs at our clean energy workshops 

Throughout July we’re running a series of OS API workshops around Britain to help you get to grips with OS data and understand how geospatial data can support clean energy initiatives.  

The free two-hour sessions involve hands-on work with our OS Maps and OS Places APIs and you’ll be able to increase your geospatial skills and find out how to make the most of OS data. Our Geovation team will be hosting the events and will share how their customers and partners are using OS data and how the team can support SMEs. Our Consultancy and Technical team will lead the API workshops to share their expertise in using OS data.  

We’ll use the workshop to focus on a specific problem space relating to clean energy, exploring solutions through the use of geospatial data and Application Programming Interfaces (APIs), which make data more accessible.   

What the OS API workshop covers 

  • Learn more about APIs – introduction to APIs, why they are important, terminologies, how to use them 
  • Optimise the value of OS APIs 
  • Get hand on practical advice on using APIs – how they work 
  • What else OS is planning with APIs 
  • Understand a specific problem space which relates to clean energy 

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12
Jun
2019
1

OS Data Hub

Our vision to deliver a single customer portal to provide easier access to OS products and services is continuing at pace. In the 12 months since work began on opening up OS MasterMap, we’ve been busy working with customers and testing the OS Data Hub. The design and build of the new developer portal is aimed at providing an easy to access service for our customers. It will replace our current OS OpenData download pages and the API shop, to give our customers:

  • Access to free API services up to a threshold and allow users to purchase credit for further access
  • A place to manage their accounts and view their data usage
  • The option to download OS OpenData products
  • Access to data in new and improved formats
  • Feedback on errors and omissions in OS data
  • A simple way to navigate to product information, an improved API document store, community support and help FAQs

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6
Jun
2019
5

OS and ONS release report on the geography of Britain’s high streets

When you’re out shopping, you might think it’s easy to define a high street and where it starts and ends. But is it that simple? Can a town have more than one high street? Is the road called High Street in your town still the primary shopping area? Or has the purpose of the road shifted over time?

Graphic asking where is Britain's longest high street

We’ve been working with the Office for National Statistics (ONS) to define and analyse Britain’s high streets. Together, we have been working out how many high streets there are in Great Britain, what types of properties and businesses are on high streets, as well how the number of businesses and employment has changed in recent years. Read More

23
Apr
2019
0

New Data Exploration Licence released by the Geospatial Commission 

We’ve been working with the Geospatial Commission alongside The British Geological Survey, Coal Authority, HM Land Registry and The UK Hydrographic Office to create a single Data Exploration Licence. The single licence replaces a number of different agreements from the five partner bodies and allows registers users to freely access available data to research and develop their own ideas and propositions. 

We were pleased to provide our own Data Exploration Licence as a template for the new partner body licences. First released to Geovation Hub members as a trial in 2016, we later rolled out the OS Data Exploration Licence in October 2016 

Over the past two years we have seen over 300 registrations from start-ups to large commercial companies sign up to the agreement, including those starting to explore opportunities to create new products and services. We look forward to seeing this trend accelerate with the introduction of the four new licences from the Geospatial Commission, providing users with access to a far wider range of geospatial data. 

Benefits of a partner body Data Exploration Licence 

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18
Apr
2019
2

Welsh and English trig pillars completion

Today is the 83rd anniversary of the first use of an Ordnance Survey trig pillar, so the perfect time to catch up with Britain’s top trig-bagger, Rob Woodall, on his latest achievement. 

I bagged my final Welsh trig pillar in 2008 – sort of. At that time, I counted 660 trig pillars still surviving in Wales, and Red Hill, S6561, east of Builth Wells was my last, on a blustery August day. We celebrated with a Balvenie single malt (somehow not a Penderyn).

Red Hill (Photo: Rob Woodall)

But had I really finished? The OS originally built 684 pillars in Wales – what about the others? At that time, I was focused on extant pillars, trying to get around as many trigs as I could before they were lost to housing developments, road construction, farming operations and the like.  I’d visited all the remaining English, Isle of Man and Scottish pillars by 2016, so it was time to think about visiting the remaining vacant trig sites. Some were simply in-situ replacements, the pillars being rebuilt on the same site, with the same flush bracket or occasionally a new one.  Sites that used to have a trig pillar, aren’t inherently as interesting to the bagger as those where there’s something to look for, but the scenery is still there (if it hasn’t been built on), and in some cases, the pillars weren’t quite as dead as we thought: Read More

2
Apr
2019
9

New poster to celebrate 70 years of Britain’s National Parks

It’s 70 years since the 1949 Act of Parliament that began the family of National Parks in Great Britain, and our GeoDataViz team have created a stunning poster to showcase the varied landscapes of our 15 beautiful National Parks.

Image showing all 15 of Britain's National Parks

You can buy this poster in the OS Map Shop

Covering a combined area of 23,138 km2 (that’s around 10% of Great Britain and an area slightly larger than Wales) the National Parks offer us a stunning variety of landscapes to explore. With two parks in Scotland, three in Wales and ten in England, they’re accessible to many of us, no matter where we live.

National Parks fortnight kicks off on 6 April, so what better time to be inspired to visit one, and try out some of the 61,000 km of paths to follow? Read More

21
Mar
2019
14

Magnetic north continues its march to the east

As expert map readers will know, when you’re out and about navigating with a compass, there is a difference between magnetic north (where the compass points) and grid north (the vertical blue grid lines shown on OS maps). And if you’re exploring in the west of Great Britain, there is a change to be aware of…

The difference between magnetic north and grid north is often referred to as grid magnetic angle and it not only varies from place to place, but changes with time too, and needs to be taken into account when navigating with a map and compass.

In 2014 there was a significant event in the changing direction of magnetic north relative to grid north on OS maps. For the first time in Great Britain since the 1660s, magnetic north moved from being to the west of grid north to the east. The change started in the very south west corner of Britain, currently affects the areas to the west of the line on our map, and will slowly progress across the whole country over the next 12 to 13 years.

Map of Great Britain with a line marking the areas now to the east of magnetic north for the first time since the 1660s

The line represents the approximate path of where magnetic north currently equals grid north

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20
Mar
2019
2

Quantifying Britain’s greenspaces with data and standards

By Andrew Cooling, Strategic Development Manager (Government Relationships Team)

There’s a growing body of research showing a connection between greenspaces and human health and wellbeing.

So much so, areas of green – including parks, public gardens and open spaces – are now a key consideration in the design and structure of towns, cities and communities.

Research into this field comes from all sectors, including social, medical, transport, recreation, housing and planning.

One independent study by land management charity The Land Trust looked at the value of greenspaces and their impact on society. The Value of Greenspaces report reveals that they play a positive part in 90% of people’s wellbeing. Those living near these spaces felt more encouraged to stay fit and healthy, and believed that green areas helped make their communities more desirable (leading to economic uplift).

Greenspaces also improve air quality, reduce the likelihood of flooding, mitigate climate change and are havens for wildlife.

The 2014 International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health states that:

‘Green space should be accessible to as many people as possible. People are more likely to visit green space if they do not have to travel far to reach it, and the most frequent visitors report the greatest benefits to their mental wellbeing.’

There are economic benefits, too. According to the Office for National Statistics’ Natural Capital Accounts, the value associated with living near a green space is estimated to be just over £130 billion in the UK.

With this in mind, further research has been happening in the geospatial arena. What kind of greenspace? Where exactly is it? And how accessible?  More insight is being applied to greenspaces to make them more ‘quantifiable’. Read More