By

Ordnance Survey team

20
Mar
2015
0

New OS partner Land Technologies

Today we bring you a guest blog from Land Technologies, participants in our Developer Challenge who have gone on to become an Ordnance Survey partner.

Our original submission to the developer challenge was about creating a web application that makes it easy to quickly assess land to judge its potential for development. Many housing projects don’t get started because the initial piece of work of finding a good site at the right price is very difficult. We want to change that.

Preview of Land Insight

Signing up as a licensed partner and using OS data was important to us so we can make the best possible  product for our customers. As well as the data, OS provided the guidance needed to help us pick the right products and licenses for our business – which is very important for us as a start-up. Read More

19
Mar
2015
0

Winners of the GeoVation Housing Challenge

By

GeoVation camp 2015

In September we launched our latest GeoVation challenge — ‘How can we enable people in Britain to live in better places?’ — which was run in partnership with Land Registry.

In total, 43 ideas were submitted to the challenge. Out of nine finalists selected to pitch their ideas to our judging panel, three winners were awarded funding to develop their innovation:
Read More

17
Feb
2015
1

We’re using the Open Government Licence to encourage greater use of OS OpenData products

As part of ongoing moves to make our data even more accessible and easier for start-ups and others to understand and use, we are pleased to announce that following close work with The National Archives we have now adopted the Open Government Licence (OGL) version 3.0 in place of our OS OpenData licence.

We were delighted to work with the The National Archives throughout 2014, in helping form this new version of the OGL, and were enthusiastic throughout to explain and navigate through previous sticking points that had prevented us from adopting the OGL in its entirety in the past. In particular, one of these sticking points concerned the issue of sublicensing and giving greater clarity as to the applicability of OGL terms to sublicensees, a matter that has been addressed in this new version of the OGL.  Read More

10
Oct
2013
0

OS OpenData interactive postcode viewer

We recently wrote about the work of our on our summer interns in our Labs team, Joseph Braybrook, creating a Minecraft map of Great Britain. During his time with us Joseph also created an interactive postcode viewer for exploring all 1.7 million postcodes in Great Britain.

The idea came from a demo program included with Processing – a programming language and development environment with a focus on creating audio/visual applications. The demo visualises 41,557 US zipcodes as individual points as shown in the screenshot below.

We decided it would be interesting to try the same approach using British postcodes, which are readily available as open data in our Code-Point Open product. This is a much larger dataset with almost 1.7 million individual records.

To further showcase what can be achieved with OS OpenData we also incorporated some of our mapping in the form of OS VectorMap District.

Read More

4
Jul
2013
0

Ordnance Survey features on CBBC’s Blue Peter

A camera crew together with well-known TV presenter Helen Skelton recently visited Ordnance Survey to film a piece about the importance of maps for Blue Peter.

The team spent two days filming various areas which included the Flying Unit at East Midlands Airport, our Remote Sensing and Cartography departments, and a ground survey. Everything will be pieced together by Blue Peter to tell the story of how we capture the geographic information through to how it gets onto the map.

Helen Skelton filming for a Blue Peter piece on the importance of maps

Matthew Carlisle, from Remote Sensing at Ordnance Survey, said: “Having been brought up watching Blue Peter I was really happy to take part in the filming. It’s a well-respected TV programme, and it’s great that we got the opportunity to promote our work to a younger audience and show that there’s more to us than paper maps.

Read More

31
May
2013
0

Putting my mark on the map

In today’s age of automated systems and electronic data sources, it can be easy to forget that people are at the heart of what we do as an organisation. Keen to get back to the grass roots of what our organisation does, (collecting and maintaining of geographic data), I arranged to spend the day with one of Ordnance Survey’s nation-wide team of 250 surveyors.

I met Jeremy Thompson, a surveyor in one of the five London teams (which forms part of the South Region) at the London office, within the imposing National Audit Office building. Although three surveyors use this as a base, most surveyors work from home – Jeremy has an office set up in his garden shed!

As well as experiencing the move to homeworking, Jeremy has seen big changes during his 27-year career. He said: “I joined Ordnance Survey after completing my A levels, mainly for the reason of wanting a job outside and not being tied to an office. Geography and technical drawing were my two favourite subjects at school, so a job which seemed to combine the two seemed ideal.”

Jeremy explained that it is still quite common for people to associate Ordnance Survey with our paper maps, and not realise the level of detail which is captured by the surveyor. He said: “Since 1986, the job has evolved massively over the years; to working with digital data on a pen tablet instead of film documents and Rotring pens, and using GPS/GNSS, together with other modern-day equipment. The information we capture on the ground is used to inform a wide variety of organisations, across both the private and public sector. The range of rich data we now collect has widened greatly – it is much more complex, including a whole host of attributes, such as addresses and road routing.”

Each surveyor manages their own bank of jobs; with various criteria enabling them prioritise workloads. There are different types of surveying jobs scheduled on the system, all deadline based, and flagged up at various intervals – and the hours spent in front of a computer varies, dependent on each individual job. The surveyors can view intelligence about sites, which has been gathered from various sources, such as local authorities and commercial organisations. Information is also added from the network of surveyors who can make observations out in the field.  The combination of details enables the surveyor to prepare for a job, and have a full background of the site.

Our surveyor Jeremy in London

Read More

26
Apr
2013
0

Go! Rhinos

In celebration of its 40th anniversary this year, Hampshire’s Marwell Wildlife is bringing a world-class mass public art event to Southampton.

The Go! Rhinos event, will take place in the city over a 10-week period this summer. Southampton will be the home to a herd of sponsored rhino sculptures, which will be placed at various locations across the city centre to form a rhino trail.

Various organisations will be sponsoring the rhino sculptures, and the rhinos will be decorated by local professional artists, providing a unique design on each piece – part of the fun will be following the trail and choosing your favourite rhino!

Reggie the rhino and some friends

As well as providing the opportunity to showcase local artistic talent, the event encourages outdoors exploration, whilst raising significant funds for local charities; Marwell Wildlife, The Rose Road Association and Wessex Heartbeat’s High 5 Appeal.

Ordnance Survey will be involved in a variety of ways. We are sponsoring one of the rhinos, which will be forming part of the rhino trail, and will be producing the official Southampton trail map. We’ll also be plotting the route of the rhinos online using OS OpenSpace data.

Read More

19
Mar
2013
0

Cambridgeshire surveyor embarks on Arctic dog-sled fund-raising expedition

In February 2013, Kevin Pallant from Chippenham, Cambridgeshire, embarked on a challenging five-day expedition travelling over 200 km, 145 km north of the Arctic Circle, to raise funds for charity.

Kevin, one of our surveyors, swopped the comforts of home to take part in the Arctic Circle Dog Sled trip organised by Charity Challenge. Kevin’s job involves working outside surveying the buildings, roads and features of Great Britain in all weathers. The recent cold snap was good practice for this trip of a lifetime, where temperatures varied from -5oC to -27oC.

Kevin travelled over frozen lakes, through snow covered forests and into the mountains, with the added challenge of driving a team of Huskies. The challenge started near Kiruna, Northern Sweden, and after meeting and getting to know the other participants, the first task was to master how to harness and drive a team of four Huskies without falling off.

The group travelled across the wilds of Northern Sweden, through forests and across frozen lakes. The stunning scenery, vast expanses of snowy landscape and blue sky were a joy to be in, such a change to the drab grey days. Travelling at 15 km an hour with only the sounds of the sled runners, dog’s paws going over the ice and snow and the jangle of the harnesses to fill the ears, was a delightful experience.

Read More

22
Feb
2013
0

Style sheets available for all our vector products

Ordnance Survey has developed and released a full set of style sheets for all its vector products, including OS MasterMap Topography Layer and OS VectorMap Local. The new style sheets, an addition to the initial release of a set of OS OpenData Styled Layer Descriptors (SLDs) released in December 2012, will make it easier for users to ‘plug in and play’ and build Ordnance Survey maps into their web services or geographical information system (GIS).

Made available under an open licence, SLDs are commonly used in conjunction with a web server to style data for a web map service (WMS).  They have been developed in an open structured format that will easily enable conversion to desktop GIS readable style sheets.

Styling applied using QGIS software

Increasingly customers and partners need to present our vector products in a suitable raster style, for their Intranet service for example; that can be quite a time consuming process. We have created the SLDs to help reduce the time and resource needed to properly apply cartographic styling for web and GIS visualisation and enable their products to reflect the Ordnance Survey style and feel.

Read More

30
Jan
2013
0

Sticky fingers not essential

Gold award winning Digimap for Schools has now been optimised for the iPad.  That familiar screen pinch and finger swipe will now navigate you through the scales and seamlessly pan you around Ordnance Survey’s OS MasterMap, the most detailed digital mapping available. 

Designed for use by both primary and secondary teachers and pupils Digimap for Schools is suitable for teaching geography as well as a range of subjects including history, social studies, economics and business studies.  It is an online service where no installation or maintenance is required.  Ordnance Survey has enabled the service to be fully functional on iPads in recognition of the rising popularity of these tablets and their usability, being especially good for primary age children. For optimal performance with Digimap for Schools we recommend using iPad 2 and 3 running 1OS 6.

Digimap for Schools features a number of tools to enhance your mapping. Annotation tools allow you to add point markers of varying designs, draw regular and irregular polygons of differing colours and opacity, draw lines of differing weights and designs, add text labels and change the font size, label polygons, lines and points.  Any features drawn will appear on screen and can be printed.  Measuring tools give you the ability to measure distances and areas on the maps.  Printed maps can be created at either A4 or A3 size, portrait or landscape and in pdf, jpeg or png formats and maps can be saved.  You also have the option to show the national grid overlay on your maps on-screen, as well as have a full screen map.

Read More

1 2 3 15