By

GeoDataViz

9
Jan
2020
11

The GeoDataViz team’s favourite maps of 2019

Mappy New Year! 2019 was a great year for cartography, especially geo data visualisation. We loved seeing such amazing maps and visuals being produced by some very talented people, and the standard just seems to be getting better and better. Inspired by all the brilliant work we’ve seen, we thought we’d pull together some of our favourites. There are too many to include so this list is by no means exhaustive, but we hope you enjoy our picks.

Surfing Saco Bay, Margot Carpenter

Created by independent cartographer Margot Carpenter, this stunning map depicts Maine’s Saco Bay. The detail is incredible, and we love how the map focuses on the bay’s underwater topography and wave dynamics and how they fuel the bays amazing surfing conditions. There is also a beautiful compass rose that illustrates wave height and a visualisation depicting how bathymetry and waves create surf!

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10
Dec
2019
2

Try our new OS Open Zoomstack styles for colour blind users

We’re looking for your feedback on our new styles for OS Open Zoomstack. They’re aimed at making our data more accessible to those with colour vision deficiency (CVD). Find out about the work that Jessica Baker, Graduate Data Scientist, has been doing on the styles and try them out for yourself.

Unless you’re colour blind, you are unlikely to be aware of the problems which cartographic styles and colour schemes cause for those affected by CVD.  Colours usually easily distinguishable to the human eye, such as red and green, appear very similar and can make elements of map reading more difficult. The issue is often overlooked, with traditional spectral rainbow colour schemes kicking up several difficulties for those with colour blindness.

During my first few weeks at OS on the Graduate Development Programme, I’ve been learning how we can improve the accessibility of data. I decided to start by developing free downloadable styles for our popular OS Open Zoomstack product – an exciting project to work on.

Source: https://www.color-blindness.com/deuteranopia-red-green-color-blindness/

https://www.color-blindness.com/tritanopia-blue-yellow-color-blindness/ Read More

15
May
2019
2

OS Moon map celebrates 50th anniversary of the Moon landing

This year marks the 50th year anniversary of the Moon landing, and to celebrate the occasion the OS GeoDataViz team decided to create a map of Apollo 11’s lunar landing site in our unique map style (available to buy in our OS map shop). Find out how Paul Naylor approached the task.

OS moon map

On 20 July 1969 at 20:17 GMT, Apollo 11 touched down on the moon. Six hours later Neil Armstrong became the first person to step onto the lunar surface. It was a monumental achievement for humanity.

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10
May
2019
4

Excellence in Cartography: OS Open Zoomstack scoops award

We were delighted to have two entries shortlisted for the inaugural Geography in Government Awards this year. We were even more pleased to win one as OS Open Zoomstack scooped the prize for ‘Excellence in geo-visualisation and cartography’, up against tough competition from the Defence Geographic Centre (DGC).

Some of the OS team attended the awards ceremony on 25 April at Scotland House in London and enjoyed a great evening which celebrated the best of geography across Government. OS Open Zoomstack is our latest open data product which we launched in January after a successful trial throughout summer 2018. For this award we owe a huge thank you to everyone who took part in the trial and made this product a success. Without your feedback and support it wouldn’t have been possible.

OS team collecting the award for OS Open Zoomstack

Accepting the award

What’s happened since the launch?

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21
Nov
2018
8

Tutorial – visualising data in Kepler with the RNLI

On 28 February 1823, Sir William Hillary made an impassioned appeal to the nation, calling for a service dedicated to saving lives at sea. That service was to become the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI).

Did you know?

  • There are 238 lifeboat stations around the coasts of Great Britain, Ireland, the Isle of Man and Channel Islands.
  • Tower Lifeboat Station on the River Thames in London is the RNLI’s busiest.
  • There are 349 lifeboats in the RNLI fleet.
  • The RNLI have 4,966 volunteers.
  • It cost £176.5m to run the RNLI in 2017.

Last week we looked at using QGIS to create some visualisations using data from the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) and Ordnance Survey. This week we will be taking the same datasets and working with them within Kepler, Uber’s new open source geospatial analysis tool.

KEPLER (Pt 1)

Kepler is great for creating a range of different visualisations easily and quickly, and to begin with we are going to look at creating a visualisation depicting where in the UK most emergency call-outs are made. To do this we will need to download the RNLI Return of Service data.

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14
Nov
2018
3

Tutorial – visualising data in QGIS with the RNLI

In an emergency the importance of location is critical. Knowing the precise whereabouts of an incident can be the difference between life and death.

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) are the charity that saves lives at sea. Responsible for saving over 140,000 lives since their formation in 1824 they work with a dedicated team of volunteers, staff and community fundraisers. They allow us to enjoy our shorelines and water, safe in the knowledge that in an emergency they will be there to assist us.

There is a lot of data behind the lifesaving and in 2017 RNLI teamed up with ESRI to create an open data portal to help share some of this data.

Find out how to create a data visualisation like this using QGIS

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10
Oct
2018
4

OS Open Zoomstack is no longer just a 3-month trial!

We’ve had such a great response to the trial and received a huge amount of feedback from the users, that we’re going to invest in making OS Open Zoomstack a supported product.

For both the downloads and the API we’ll be developing Alpha versions and continue to make changes based on your feedback. We’ll be doing an alpha release shortly for the various downloads. We’ll also continue supporting the API, and will update this with the new data from the Alpha while we plan the release of a fully supported version in the future. Please note that this may involve changes in the API URL at a minimum.

At this point we would like to say a huge thank you to everyone who has helped us to make this exciting step!
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3
Sep
2018
6

Dynamic hillshade: create realistic terrain visualisations using OS Open Zoomstack

Inspired by the Mapbox blog – Tim Manners in our OS Labs team built this awesome demo application to showcase the dynamic hillshade. The demo includes a widget which enables you to change the light source directly on the client and see the map change in real-time. Tim used our OS Terrain 50 DTM grid dataset to generate a series of Terrain-RGB tiles. These tiles contain elevation data encoded in raster PNG tiles as colour values that can be decoded to raw heights in metres and rendered on the client-side for customisable terrain visualisations. Take a look below for how it appears when combined this with the OS Open Zoomstack Vector Tile API:

Want to make your own?

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8
Aug
2018
0

Join us at the UK Mapping Festival

Celebrate the UK’s first ever Mapping Festival with a week-long programme of education, inspiration, entertainment and most importantly, maps! It’s being held in London from 2-7 September 2018.

The UK Mapping Festival (UKMF) will feature exhibitions, workshops, visits, social gatherings, seminars with Festival guests, and activities for families and young people.

There are three exciting conference days, around the themes of GeoTechnologies, Mapping for the Future and Imagery and Survey in a 3D world. Talks from leading specialists and industry innovators along with hands-on workshops allow you to hear about and experience some of the latest developments in our rapidly changing world. Read More

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