By

Cartographic Design team

16
Oct
2015
1

Talking open data at #ODCamp

TArrivalhree of OS’ regular bloggers, Christopher Wesson, Jon Field and Luke Hampson spent the weekend at Open Data Camp (#ODCamp) held at Manchester Metropolitan University’s digital innovation space known as ‘The Shed’. Catch up on their views from the event.

Paul Maltby kicked off proceedings with a discussion presentation uncovering a project that he is leading that will look to capitalise on the great work that’s already been done by public sector through the release of data through data.gov.uk over the last five years. We should be as excited as he by the next five, as UK Government concentrates on making data more accessible, more interoperable (by defining data standards, structures etc.) and more useable; all of which should unlock more value. Read More

23
Sep
2015
1

Mapping Together

This month saw the British Cartographic Society (BCS) and the Society of Cartographers (SoC) join forces in York to host Mapping Together, the first joint conference since 2003. This event contained an inspirational collection of presentations and workshops, the annual BCS awards ceremony and a corporate members exhibition. OS were Platinum sponsors once again – hosted workshops, presented and also sponsored an award. We were well represented at the event with six colleagues in attendance, including Cartographic Design Consultant Paul Naylor who is also a member of the BCS organising committee.

Mapping Together: A packed conference room

Mapping Together: A packed conference room

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19
Aug
2015
0

New simple guides for OS OpenData products

Guest post by summer intern, Jessica Fisher

Under the banner of OS OpenData are over a dozen products which vary in format, scale and design to offer the greatest flexibility and usability possible. These products are all freely downloadable from our OS website – and now there are new start-up guides to using a number of the products.

OS  Open Map Local in QGIS

OS Open Map Local in QGIS

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31
Mar
2015
0

Enter the BCS Awards 2015

At OS, we sponsor and judge one of the British Cartographic Society (BCS) awards and once again this year we will be rewarding cartographic excellence and the innovative use of OS OpenData. The 2015 awards launched in March and are made annually at the society’s symposium which this year promises to be a fantastic event as it is being jointly hosted with the Society of Cartographers (SoC).

London

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16
Jan
2015
0

Cartographic Design Principles: Summary

In our previous eight posts we have taken a closer look at each of our Cartographic Design Principles. We offer them as a set of guidelines, intended to focus and aid the design process when making a map. They are not rules. In cartography, rules as such don’t exist – the aim is for a map to communicate a message to its users, and if it does so then it can be deemed a success. If a map is designed to get a person from A to B and it does, then it works. The distinction is not between right and wrong but between a map that works well, and one that doesn’t; between good communication and bad communication.

This means that there is lots of room for creativity within cartography!

Tron

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9
Jan
2015
0

Cartographic Design Principles: Good composition

Over the past eight weeks we have taken a closer look at each of our Cartographic Design Principles in turn. This is the final post in the series as we switch our attention to Good composition. Although we consider all eight of our principles to be of equal importance, we have purposefully put this one at the end as it will usually be the last thing you do. It’s important to consider the overall composition of your map from the start of the design process, but it’s a good idea to check the composition and layout at the end, to ensure that all the elements work well as a ‘whole’.

BenNevis Read More

12
Dec
2014
0

Cartographic Design Principles: Legibility

We are just over halfway through our series of posts about our Cartographic Design Principles. Last week we shone the spotlight on Simplicity and this week we continue our series as we turn our attention to Legibility. In its simplest definition, to be legible is to be easily read. It is extremely important for a map to be legible as the user should be able to easily understand the message that the cartographer was attempting to portray. Much in the same way as a book, if a map is difficult to read then it is likely to fail in its objective and not meet the user requirements.

Explorer_1

OS Explorer Maps – designed for usability and legibility  Read More