By

GeoDataViz

2
Oct
2017
1

Mapping for Changing Reality

By Paul Naylor

The British Cartographic Society (BCS) and the Society of Cartographers (SoC) joint conference recently got underway at the Redworth Hall Hotel in Durham. After months of careful planning and organisation the stage was set for three days of inspirational presentations, hands-on workshops and the annual BCS/SoC awards ceremony.

Maps for Changing Reality 2017. Photo by Martin Lubikowski Read More

5
Sep
2017
1

Sign up for the ‘Water, Water, Everywhere’ hackathon

OS and Geovation have partnered with the RNLI and Bournemouth Council to organise a hackathon looking at how geospatial data can keep people safe in and around the water.

Join us at the Water, Water, Everywhere hack on 30 September to develop and build your great ideas.

The problem

How can we keep people safe near the water? It’s a place to relax, a source of inspiration, somewhere to have fun with friends or get the adrenaline racing and the heart pumping. But it’s also an unpredictable force that demands respect. Every year, around 190 people drown in UK and Irish waters – half of them didn’t even intend to get wet. Drowning is a problem – and we need to solve it. Read More

9
Aug
2017
4

Carto Design to GeoDataViz: An evolution

Regular readers of this blog will be familiar with the work of our Cartographic Designers. The team have been posting a variety of articles here since 2013 from reviews of events to sharing helpful resources. The team recently made some changes to the way in which they work and the work that they undertake, including a name change; from Cartographic Design to GeoDataViz.

In this post the team will consider some of the reasons why, and what the changes mean for them, their work and our customers.

This visualisation, which we created in June 2016, was the trigger for us to review our team and led to the changes that we have made subsequently. It was the first time that we had published a geographic visualisation that doesn’t contain any topographic data. We simply plotted the GPS data using colour techniques that help represent the density. This method is much more abstract (possibly considered as more art than science) than our traditional topographic maps but we felt it gave us a more engaging and visually stunning visualisation. Read More

2
Jun
2017
2

#CartoClinic – how can we help?

We held the first #CartoClinic at #DataMash at our head office recently. Over the two days we engaged with over 100 people discussing cartography, geography, data visualisation and more.

CartoClinic is a simple way to get in touch and get help whether you are having problems with your GI or concerns with your cartography. Made up of Paul Naylor and Charley Glynn from our GeoDataViz team, we can also call on industry experts from both within OS and from our extensive external network. Read More

9
May
2017
3

Making the most of OS OpenData

Last month marked the seven year anniversary of OS OpenData. We have recently shared insights into how our open products are made and how they are being used. In this post we would like to share some of the other activities we undertake to support our open data and support the community of users, including those involved with free and open source software.

The take-up and effective use of our datasets are fundamental to their success. With this in mind we have produced various resources that lower the barrier to entry and make use easier. We also support the community of users in various ways, from sponsorship of events and awards to the release of assets and resources to lower the barriers of entry.

Resources

If you are using, or planning to use OS OpenData then you can find help and support here. There are frequently asked questions and a forum for posting questions and keeping up to date with the latest announcements. Read More

3
May
2017
4

Introducing visual deconstructions

Taking visualisations apart to understand how they were made

Have you ever looked at a map (or any data visualisation for that matter) and thought, I wonder how that was made? If so, then a new concept that we’re calling visual deconstructions, could help.

What is a visual deconstruction?

A visual deconstruction is a concept that our GeoDataViz team have created, allowing them to record the styling rules for a given data visualisation. It is made up of a title, a description, a url where relevant, keyword tags, an image, plus the draw order and styling information for each layer of data from which it is compiled.

It is a form of documentation that allows you to quickly reference and recreate styling rules, as well as being able to share it clearly with others. It is also a great way to learn how something is made and therefore is a useful tool for someone designing their own visualisation.

For a better idea, here is a minified version of what a visual deconstruction looks like:

Read More

13
Apr
2017
1

Enter the BCS Awards

We’re pleased to announce that The British Cartographic Society (BCS) are collecting entries for their 2017 awards. Their range of award categories aims to recognize the very best cartographic work and scholarship from around the globe and entries are welcomed from all areas of the mapping community.

We provide the BCS with an award to encourage excellence in cartographic design and the innovative and exciting use of OS OpenData. Over the years, we have had some excellent entries including this winning entry from Ashley Clough at Parallel in 2013.

Read More

6
Apr
2017
2

Map your London

Our GeoDataViz team took part in the ‘Late at the library: you are here’ event hosted by the British Library, with demos and displays by OS and the Geovation Hub, amongst other mappy delights. Find out what happened at the event.

Hosting ‘Map Your London’, we came equipped with sharpies and an (almost) blank canvas of London. Our aim was to understand how those living in London visualise their city. How do they navigate? How would they depict Big Ben or 30 St Mary Axe? What names do they use to describe historic and modern landmarks? So, armed with a pen we let them get to work…

Read More

2
Mar
2017
3

Enter the Barbara Petchenik Children’s Map Competition 2017

A fantastic way to inspire a love of cartography at an early age, have you heard of the  Barbara Petchenik Children’s Map Competition 2017? Barbara was a leading cartographer whose work related to children. In her memory, the International Cartographic Association holds a biennial competition.

2015 overall winner: The world in our hands by Pan Sin Yi (aged 15)

Read More

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