Category

Cartography

28
Nov
2018
2

Tutorial – visualising data in Tableau with the RNLI

So far, we have looked at visualising Royal National Lifeboat Institute and Ordnance Survey data using QGIS and Kepler software. In this, our third technical blog, we will be using Tableau.

Tableau is a data visualisation software that is used for creating a wide range of different visualisation to interactively present data and obtain insights. It has a very intuitive user interface and you don’t need any coding knowledge to work with it. For this tutorial we will be using Tableau Public which can be downloaded here.

We will be creating a spider map or origin-destination map that shows paths between our origins (RNLI stations) and destinations (call-outs). All the data you will need for this tutorial can be found here.

Within this data folder there is a CSV file called tableau_finished which was created using a combination of the RNLI_Return_of_Service_20082006.csv and RNLI_Lifeboat_Station_Locations.csv. Read More

21
Nov
2018
1

Tutorial – visualising data in Kepler with the RNLI

On 28 February 1823, Sir William Hillary made an impassioned appeal to the nation, calling for a service dedicated to saving lives at sea. That service was to become the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI).

Did you know?

  • There are 238 lifeboat stations around the coasts of Great Britain, Ireland, the Isle of Man and Channel Islands.
  • Tower Lifeboat Station on the River Thames in London is the RNLI’s busiest.
  • There are 349 lifeboats in the RNLI fleet.
  • The RNLI have 4,966 volunteers.
  • It cost £176.5m to run the RNLI in 2017.

Last week we looked at using QGIS to create some visualisations using data from the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) and Ordnance Survey. This week we will be taking the same datasets and working with them within Kepler, Uber’s new open source geospatial analysis tool.

KEPLER (Pt 1)

Kepler is great for creating a range of different visualisations easily and quickly, and to begin with we are going to look at creating a visualisation depicting where in the UK most emergency call-outs are made. To do this we will need to download the RNLI Return of Service data.

Read More

14
Nov
2018
2

Tutorial – visualising data in QGIS with the RNLI

In an emergency the importance of location is critical. Knowing the precise whereabouts of an incident can be the difference between life and death.

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) are the charity that saves lives at sea. Responsible for saving over 140,000 lives since their formation in 1824 they work with a dedicated team of volunteers, staff and community fundraisers. They allow us to enjoy our shorelines and water, safe in the knowledge that in an emergency they will be there to assist us.

There is a lot of data behind the lifesaving and in 2017 RNLI teamed up with ESRI to create an open data portal to help share some of this data.

Find out how to create a data visualisation like this using QGIS

Read More

26
Oct
2018
1

Great Britain’s largest islands – poster now available

If you loved our data visualisation showing Great Britain’s largest islands – great news, it’s now available to buy. In case you missed it at the time, our GeoDataViz team worked with Alasdair Rae at the University of Sheffield to explore Britain’s largest islands. They found that there are 82 English, Scottish and Welsh islands larger than 5km2 and created this beautiful poster to showcase their work.

We were overwhelmed with the fantastic response to the poster and inundated with hundreds of questions, many asking about missing islands. As we were only looking at Great Britain’s islands, this didn’t include Northern Ireland’s islands, the Isle of Man or the Channel Islands. You can see more about the difference between Great Britain, the United Kingdom and our Crown Dependencies in this blog. There are many more islands around Great Britain smaller than 5km2 – they’re just not included on the poster.

We also had a lot of requests for a printed poster, and our friends at the University of Sheffield have made this happen. There are a limited number of posters available, at A1 size which you can buy on their website for £15. Read More

2
Oct
2018
2

Meet the team: Joe Harrison

Continuing our series to introduce some friendly faces from the people working at OS and showcase the wide variety of work we do, meet Joe Harrison. Joe joined OS on our graduate scheme in 2017 as a data scientist and has worked in a few areas of the business so far. If you’re a follower of the blog, you may recognise some of the project Joe’s worked on…

Hi, I’m Joe, one of the data science grads from the most recent graduate scheme. My first placement was an eight-month stay in the Consultancy & Technical Services team from September until the end of March. I then moved to the GeoDataViz team with Charley and Paul for a two-month placement.

Scottish Boundary Commission 

During my first week in the team, Charley was contacted by the Scottish Boundary Commission who wanted advice on how to visualise the new Scottish constituency boundaries and the changes. I created a couple of examples using QGIS. I improved the clarity of the maps by reducing the number of colours, and by adding shadows to emphasise areas of interest. Read More

19
Jul
2018
3

Your right to roam with public rights of way

Did you know, we show over 220,000 km of public rights of way on our maps? Approximately 170,000 km of these are footpaths and 40,000 km are bridleways. Over 4,600 km are National Trails and 30,900 km are recreational routes!

One thing we’re often asked about is when someone has followed a public right of way shown on our map and found no visible footpath on the ground. Why is this? Public rights of way information is sent to us by local authorities, and a right of way doesn’t necessarily mean a footpath on the ground. We’re also often asked about blocked or overgrown rights of way. These need to be reported to your local authority too and, if any changes on our maps are required, they will pass that information along.

We also map rights of way permissive footpaths and bridleways as well as byways. And, if you don’t know the key differences or symbols of each of the types, you’re in the right place to find out!

Read More

28
Jun
2018
15

Britain’s largest islands

UPDATE – buy the poster here: https://onlineshop.shef.ac.uk/product-catalogue/professional-services/university-gifts-souvenirs/great-britains-islands-poster

Great Britain is an island in its own right, but aside from the mainland, there are hundreds of islands around the British coast, many uninhabited*. Inspired by David Garcia’s data visualisation of the Philippines, our GeoDataViz team worked with Alasdair Rae at the University of Sheffield to explore Britain’s largest islands.

They found that there are 82 English, Scottish and Welsh islands larger than 5km2. Scotland boasts the vast majority with 71, not surprising when you consider the Outer Hebrides, Shetland and Orkney and other beautiful islands off the coast. Wales had just 2 entries and England 9.

Read More

7
Jun
2018
1

Making antique maps more accessible

Guest blog by Sophie Kirkpatrick, Founder of Atlas & I.Have you ever met anyone who doesn’t love an antique map? Their unique charm and history is endlessly relatable and you can never tire of exploring an old map of a sentimental location. To study old maps in antiquarian book shops and libraries is one undertaking, but to own an original antique map is a luxury reserved for the wealthy or bequeathed.

Cartography or map making has been an integral part of human history for thousands of years. The earliest maps are recorded as far back as the 24th century BC, depicting simplistic line drawings of hills, rivers and cities on a clay tablet. Read More

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