Category

GI explained

12
Apr
2017
0

First public view of work towards UK GEMINI 2.3

Do you use GEMINI? See the latest version and send your feedback on the new approach. Peter Parslow, our open standards lead and chair of the AGI Standards Committee explains more.

AGI has long-maintained UK GEMINI, a guide to creating metadata for geospatial resources. Local authorities and major data publishers like ourselves, ONS, BGS, Defra all use GEMINI to describe our products – datasets and services. These records are then collated automatically to data.gov.uk, and on the European INSPIRE portal. The records in data.gov.uk can also be accessed directly from within desktop GIS tools like Arc Desktop and QGIS, by using the OGC Catalogue Server interface, and by other tools by using the CKAN API described at https://data.gov.uk/data/metadata-api-docs. There’s ongoing work in Europe to integrate this approach more with mainstream web search engines – at present, it is a bit ‘geo specialist’! Read More

13
Oct
2016
0

Are Britain’s mountains shrinking?

3DLast month we had a story about hills growing into mountains and now we blog about the opposite situation…Recent press stories about what *might* happen if rising sea levels lead to a change in the datum value used for mean sea level on OS maps, has seen some people thinking that the heights of hills and mountains might be about to shrink. They are not!

We have to measure height in Britain against a commonly agreed datum level and ‘mean sea level’ is a common value chosen in many countries. It becomes the ‘zero height’ which all other heights are measured from. As land-based creatures, it’s natural for us to think of the sea as being zero height and anything above it as being ‘high’, and consequently anything below it as having a ‘depth’. So, it’s very common to see heights of hills and mountains quoted as being ‘above mean sea level’.

What exactly is mean sea level?

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6
Oct
2016
1

Making life easier for field workers

By Daniel Slater, Sales Director, emapsite, OS Partner

Zeno 20

Zeno 20

One of the typical bugbears that field data collectors face every day is ensuring they can capture the essential information they need in the most cost-effective way.

Time on site can rapidly mount up when you can’t find fast, accurate answers to your queries straight off.

If you work for, say, a housing association, utility company or other organisation with large property holdings, the practicalities of data collection can prove costly.

It was with this common concern in mind that we came together with our friends at Leica Geosystems on a journey to help.

As you may know, Leica Geosystems make really powerful field control devices that are used all over the world. A prime example is the Zeno 20 handheld GNSS data collector. It’s a rugged, high-accuracy field device that everyone can use.  It runs on an Android operating system and it’s designed to help users collect and manage GIS and asset data. Read More

12
Sep
2016
0

OSTN15 – the new geoid for Britain

Seeing as an improvement in our model that transforms height from GPS to one above mean sea level has caused a hill to “grow” into a mountain – we thought it would be a good idea to explain how positions and heights surveyed by our surveyors with GPS make it onto our maps.

OS surveyor

OS surveyor

All positioning and surveying, not just that from GPS, has to take place on a mathematically simplified model of the surface of the Earth. The surface that the model attempts to emulate is called the geoid.  The geoid is a complex concept, but can be imagined as a hypothetical surface that would be formed if the water in the oceans, close to mean sea level, continued under the land and was only influenced by Earth’s gravity field. This surface is one we already refer to without perhaps thinking about it – we say oceans have “depth” (below the arbitrary zero height surface) and mountains have “height” (above the surface). The geoid is a complex shape since it is influenced by varying Earth gravity. It is too complex to act as our surface for the calculations involved in positioning and surveying, so we need to fit a simple model shape to it. Read More

8
Sep
2016
1

Calf Top – England’s last mountain

Guest blog by Myrddyn Phillips, Hill Data & Mountain Surveys 

Calf Top (SD 664 856) is a rather unassuming hill which is approximately 6km south of Sedbergh in the Yorkshire Dales.  It rises above the deep cleft of Barbondale to its east and Dentdale to its north, and although not the highest hill in the area it is quite prominent above its surroundings.

Calf Top

Calf Top

However, it isn’t the hill’s prominence that is of interest, it is its height, and being a mountain surveyor those hills that are given a 609m spot height on Ordnance Survey maps are particularly interesting, as this height equates to just under 2,000ft, with 609.6m the metric equivalent of this all important imperial height.  All important, as 2,000ft is generally regarded as the benchmark height in England and in Wales for when a hill is promoted to the dizzying ranks of a mountain. Read More

5
Sep
2016
3

Surveying Britain from the skies

OS plane G-FIFA at East Midlands Airport

OS plane G-FIFA at East Midlands Airport

If you were watching BBC Breakfast this morning, you may have seen their reporter, Graham Satchell, heading out with our Flying Unit and finding out how we survey Britain from the skies.

We’ve actually been using aerial photography to carry out our surveys for almost 100 years. Originally, this had the advantage of capturing information from areas that surveyors found hard to visit on foot. Today, it means we can keep on top of the data capture process – making continuous revisions of the whole nation’s landscape. Read More

2
Aug
2016
0

Is Britain on the move?

OS Maps uses GPS to position you

OS Maps uses GPS to position you

Australia has recently announced a 1.8m shift in its mapping coordinates, to compensate for the country’s 7.5cm shift north each year.  Inevitably the question is why, and could the same thing happen here?

In Australia, the shift is to take into account the growing difference between maps (and the coordinate reference system they’re based on) and the system used by satellite positioning (GPS). It’s a fact that the world is constantly shifting on tectonic plates, but maps (and their users) like fixed coordinates that don’t change. Before GPS, this was simple to achieve as most positioning and mapping was created from fixed ground points in a coordinate reference system tuned to a particular country. In Great Britain our fixed points included the very familiar trig pillars and we have a mapping coordinate reference system called OSGB36 National Grid which is fitted closely to our little bit of the Earth. Tectonic plate movements had little or no impact on the mapping coordinates or fixed points because they all moved “as one” and generally stayed the same shape.  Read More

19
Apr
2016
2

A history of the trig pillar

POI_trig_Pillars

The trig pillar network

Yesterday marked 80 years since the trig pillar was first used in the retriangulation of Great Britain on 18 April 1936. On that day, a group of surveyors gathered around a white concrete pillar in a field in Cold Ashby and began the retriangulation of Great Britain.

We’re celebrating by sharing the story of the humble trig pillar, still much loved by walkers today, and giving you the chance to join our celebrations with The Trig Pillar Trail Challenge. But what is the background to the trig pillar?

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22
Apr
2015
0

Life after the trig pillar

Talking about the 79th anniversary of the trig pillar this month has sparked a flood of reactions. Lots of our lovely followers on social media sent us pictures of them (or their dogs) with our trig pillars around Britain. Others expressed delight that they now know what those odd concrete pillars were for. Some wanted to adopt a trig pillar if we no longer used them (sorry, not something we offer). Still more people were amazed that we no longer use the vast majority of trig pillars and asked us what we use instead. The answer to that is OS Net.

Some of the fab trig pillar photos sent in to us recently

Some of the fab trig pillar photos sent in to us recently

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17
Jun
2014
0

Semantic and Geometric Enrichment of 3D Building Models

Today’s guest blogger is Jon Slade. Jon’s currently working on his PhD at Cardiff University, sponsored by Ordnance Survey.

After a fruitful year spent as a GIS Specialist at Arup I chose to change direction and return to the world of academia to study a PhD full-time at Cardiff University. Whilst I found the commercial world, in which I have worked for 15 years rewarding I missed really immersing myself deeply in a topic. My UCL MSc Summer research project ‘Google Maps Journey Immersion’ gave me a taster of this. And so, with experience of civil engineering from my time at Arup, a life-long love of maps and all things Ordnance Survey plus an unashamed fondness for reality architecture shows such as Channel 4′s Grand Designs, the opportunity to study a PhD on the Semantic and Geometric Enrichment of 3D Building Models at Cardiff, sponsored by Ordnance Survey felt ideal. This shall be my main area of work for the next 3-4 years.

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