Category

Ordnance Survey in the news

8
May
2018
3

Mapping music with Glynde

Guest blog by Ewan Campbell, composer of Glynde.

In many ways cartography is to a landscape, what music notation is to sound. They both use two-dimensional visualisations to represent something which is multi-dimensional, and in the process create a beautiful pictorial format of their own. My map enthusiasm is driven by a desire for the overview that a maps offers, and the scope to explore the virtual depiction of a landscape.

There is however a crucial difference between the two idioms: music is always experienced through the temporal dimension, and time, as we know it, can only ever run forwards. No matter how many repeats, verses, loops or recapitulations a composer may decide to add there is always a beginning which at some moment later must be followed by an ending. As a result traditional music notation is linear, and read forwards like a book. The aim of my cartographic music is to make the musical form visible. The 2-dimensional score offers a structural overview of the virtual musical soundscape, which can be imaginatively entered into, just as one would ‘read’ a topographical map.

Glynde, by Ewan Campbell

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23
Mar
2018
2

Making Ordnance Survey into a work of art

The Lakes Ignite programme for 2018 features an OS-inspired work of art called Ordnance Pavilion, paying homage to the trig pillar and the work of OS surveyors in mapping Great Britain. It’s flattering to be an artist’s muse, but we wonder if it’s not the first time OS has inspired an artwork…

Ordnance Pavilion

Created by Studio MUTT, Ordnance Pavilion is an interactive installation in the Langdale Estate in the Lake District. It forms part of Lakes Ignite 2018 which presents six contemporary artworks to celebrate the Lake District’s designation as a World Heritage site. On display between until July 2018, Ordnance Pavilion is a celebration of OS and how our maps have impacted people’s interaction with the landscape.

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17
Jan
2018
2

Geovation Hub wins an award at #GWF2018

We’re delighted to see Geovation being awarded the ‘Geospatial Hub of the Year Award’ at the Geospatial World Forum Gala Dinner this evening. The Geospatial World Leadership Awards jury recognised Geovation’s leadership role in creating a centre of excellence to nurture startups, enabling spatial innovation and entrepreneurship.

The jury noted that “Geovation has successfully connected individuals and SMEs and created opportunities, envisioned solutions and brought differentiation to the UK geospatial fraternity.” Read More

19
Dec
2017
6

Top 10 mappy blogs for 2017

With less than a fortnight left to go in 2017, we thought we’d take a look back at the year and see which blog stories piqued your interest. Let’s countdown from 10-1 on the top mappy and geo-based blogs:

  1. Taking White Hart Lane off the map

We usually share stories about our teams adding new features to the map, but we also have to remove features from our database. London-based surveyor Tony Killilea was tasked with removing a football stadium from the map back in September…

  1. London National Park City map

A stunning new map was published by Urban Good showing London green spaces, using OS OpenData. The map of the capital shows over 3,000 parks, plus woodlands, playing fields, nature reserves, city farms, rivers, canals and all the spaces that contribute to London’s parkland. Find out how to win a copy below.

  1. OS turned 226 years old

On 21 June 1791, the Board of Ordnance purchased a new Ramsden theodolite, and this is seen as the foundation of our organisation. We were to begin a survey of England’s vulnerable southern coasts, worried that the French Revolution might sweep across the English Channel.

  1. Surveying the Colonsay Whale

It’s not every day that we add a whale to our maps, but surveyor Shaun McGrath did this year…

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29
Nov
2017
3

5 books for OS map fans

Wondering what to get the map-lover in your life this Christmas? Thinking that they have more than enough maps packing their shelves? How about books about maps, loving maps, walking the countryside and more?

We’ve come up with five books that all mention Ordnance Survey and are, to some degree, about OS, maps and/or exploring beautiful Britain. Plus, there’s the chance to win a copy of one of these books below…

To research Map Addict, Mike visited the most boring OS grid square in the land, followed OS founder William Roy’s eighteenth century base line across west London, explored England’s feudal nugget, Rutland, and spent the summer solstice in Milton Keynes, in order to test the theory that it is built to a pagan alignment. What more could you need to know?

Described as ‘not quite a book about walking’, Tom Cox’s excellent new book nevertheless shines with a love of the British countryside, alongside folklore and the odd badger. Research for the book often saw Tom out walking with OS map in hand, whether in Devon, Norfolk, the Peak District or beyond. There’s also a handy reminder about not using out-of-date maps in case of ‘erosion-themed death’. We won’t spoil the book by telling you any more… Read More

24
Nov
2017
2

Autumn Budget announcement on Geospatial Commission

By Nigel Clifford, Ordnance Survey Chief Executive 

 

It was great to see ‘geospatial’ highlighted in the Autumn Budget on Wednesday. 

  

Geospatial data already supports a wide range of economic activity and there is a significant opportunity to generate growth through more effective, co-ordinated use of the vast range of geospatial data captured and managed on behalf of government. In light of this, we look forward to working with the Geospatial Commission to investigate ways to capture the full potential of that growth as it co-ordinates the geospatial agenda for the country.  Read More

22
Nov
2017
1

OS at the launch of the Year of Engineering with Primary Futures

The Year of Engineering launched at Allenby Primary School in Southall, Ealing last week and our surveyor and air camera operator Roger Nock was on hand to inspire the children. The Minister of State at the Department for Transport, John Hayes CBE MP was at the Primary Futures event along with volunteers from the world of engineering, aiming to showcase the vast range of exciting roles within the sector.

Roger at Allenby Primary School. Photo copyright Education and Employers  https://www.flickr.com/photos/edu_employers/albums/72157688592091941

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28
Jul
2017
0

Putting The Sill on the map

Opening tomorrow, during National Parks Week 2017, is The Sill National Landscape Discovery Centre in Northumberland National Park. Our surveyor Richard Bennett was on site recently to ensure the building was added to the map.

The Sill is the result of a partnership between the National Park and YHA England and Wales, including space for exhibitions, a café, a Youth Hostel, a rural business hub, and a shop specialising in local crafts and produce.

Richard was on hand to measure every aspect of the site and add the featured to 550 million in our geospatial database. His GNSS receiver locks on to several satellites and a series of ground stations (that’s right, no trig pillars required!) and the calculations are accurate to within a few centimetres. Read More

13
Jun
2017
0

Digimaps for Schools now includes geo-referenced phtos

Are you a teacher? Or a governor? Or have children at school? Then you need to know that the popular Digimap for Schools service has been updated to include over five million photos of Great Britain.

The fantastic online service already brings geography to life, with OS maps past and present, aerial photography and more. The new photos are supplied by Geograph and are set to enhance the classroom experience of discovering and exploring the country.

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31
May
2017
4

New beach huts added to the mapping database for GB

A stunning development of new beach huts on the south coast has been added to our geospatial database ahead of the summer season.

The development, in Milford on Sea, replaces the old beach huts which were damaged and destroyed during a fierce storm on 14 February 2014. With building work on 119 beach huts and the surrounding area reaching a conclusion, it provided the ideal opportunity for our surveyor Joanne Lanham to officially capture and map the changes on the site. Read More

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