Category

Using GI and maps

10
Oct
2018
1

OS Open Zoomstack is no longer just a 3-month trial!

We’ve had such a great response to the trial and received a huge amount of feedback from the users, that we’re going to invest in making OS Open Zoomstack a supported product.

For both the downloads and the API we’ll be developing Alpha versions and continue to make changes based on your feedback. We’ll be doing an alpha release shortly for the various downloads. We’ll also continue supporting the API, and will update this with the new data from the Alpha while we plan the release of a fully supported version in the future. Please note that this may involve changes in the API URL at a minimum.

At this point we would like to say a huge thank you to everyone who has helped us to make this exciting step!
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9
Oct
2018
3

Why speed data matters

Ordnance Survey (OS) Partner Basemap share their insights on speed data, why it matters and how their data is available via OS MasterMap Highways Network.

As autonomous vehicles develop around the world, we’re seeing a greater need for accurate data, both in live and static forms.

Live data enables dynamic routing, but it can be hard to pass the data from device to device quickly enough. A 5G network could help this issue, but it may take years to become a reality.

Static data is equally important as you need to have accurate base data which shows the difference between a road and a pavement, where a vehicle is allowed to drive, and any routing restrictions or speed limits. OS & GeoPlace have been working on this via the OS MasterMap Highways Network  product,  with Department for Transport investing £3 million pounds in its creation. Read More

3
Sep
2018
2

Dynamic hillshade: create realistic terrain visualisations using OS Open Zoomstack

Inspired by the Mapbox blog – Tim Manners in our OS Labs team built this awesome demo application to showcase the dynamic hillshade. The demo includes a widget which enables you to change the light source directly on the client and see the map change in real-time. Tim used our OS Terrain 50 DTM grid dataset to generate a series of Terrain-RGB tiles. These tiles contain elevation data encoded in raster PNG tiles as colour values that can be decoded to raw heights in metres and rendered on the client-side for customisable terrain visualisations. Take a look below for how it appears when combined this with the OS Open Zoomstack Vector Tile API:

Want to make your own?

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16
Aug
2018
2

Geo work experience at OS

Elsa joined our Data Office in Southampton for work experience recently and shares her experience within the team.

I’m in year 12 studying Geography, Maths, Further Maths and English A-Levels in Devon. Once in the Data Office team I had the chance to work on my own project, which was on the archaeological sites of Dartmoor. This was ideal as I became interested in OS mapping from walking on the moors training for the Ten Tors challenge. Read More

6
Jul
2018
1

England World Cup squad surnames as street names

As England’s football team aim to avoid dead ends and cul-de-sacs at the Russia World Cup – we’ve revealed the most popular street names shared by the players.

Residents across Great Britain live in 2,280 streets which share the same name as players’ surnames from England’s World Cup squad – with Danny Rose’s surname topping the table.

Whether it be Walker Lane in Rotherham, Kane Close in Coalville, or Southgate Avenue in Crawley, fans up and down the nation have added pride when cheering on the team (except maybe the good people of Welbeck Street in Kilmarnock!).  Read More

28
Jun
2018
15

Britain’s largest islands

UPDATE – buy the poster here: https://onlineshop.shef.ac.uk/product-catalogue/professional-services/university-gifts-souvenirs/great-britains-islands-poster

Great Britain is an island in its own right, but aside from the mainland, there are hundreds of islands around the British coast, many uninhabited*. Inspired by David Garcia’s data visualisation of the Philippines, our GeoDataViz team worked with Alasdair Rae at the University of Sheffield to explore Britain’s largest islands.

They found that there are 82 English, Scottish and Welsh islands larger than 5km2. Scotland boasts the vast majority with 71, not surprising when you consider the Outer Hebrides, Shetland and Orkney and other beautiful islands off the coast. Wales had just 2 entries and England 9.

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29
Mar
2018
2

The power of geospatial data in resilience planning and emergency response

The beast from the east dominated headlines this month, with snow causing traffic issues, school closures and disruption across the country. In Cumbria, the depth of the snow and challenging terrain resulted in significant issues accessing some communities. Cumbria’s multi-agency Strategic Co-ordinating Group (SCG), made up of partner agencies, secured military assistance to help access the most isolated communities, many of which had been cut off from all supplies for five days. We were asked to assist the SCG under Mapping for Emergencies (MFE).

Emergency response needs geospatial data in snow

Photo from Cumbria County Council on Twitter showing travel conditions in Croglin

One of our technical consultants, Kevin Topping, knows the power of geospatial in these situations only too well. Since joining OS last autumn, Kevin has been working with local resilience teams across England and Wales, showing how geospatial data can help in emergency planning. He ensures that authorities are aware of the data available under the Public Sector Mapping Agreement (PSMA) and how to best make use of it, including calling for extra assistance from OS under MFE. Read More

12
Mar
2018
5

Analysing urban green spaces with ONS

By Andrew Cooling and Steve Kingston, OS

The Office for National Statistics (ONS), have begun the delivery of a Great Britain-wide natural capital accounting project, gathering insights on urban green spaces and their effect on our social and economic well-being. We’ve been working with ONS on the project, along with Defra, with our GI Consultant Steve Kingston being seconded to the ONS team to provide geospatial analytical support.

The project started with a pilot in the Greater Manchester area, which delivered at the end of 2017. The pilot helped shape the methodology to deliver two parts of the urban ecosystem accounts, estimates of the extent of green space and blue space in urban areas and estimates of the services provided by this nature, such as filtering air pollution and recreational opportunity.

The urban accounts offer a coherent way of looking at the value of green space in urban areas across Britain. The project aims to help both the private and public sectors to value and monitor the extent and condition of nature in the urban environment and recognise the services it provided. The accounts will aid policy makers in prioritising investment and making informed decisions.

Illustrating the methodology used to model one of the environmental property price-influencing factors, the nearest publicly accessible green space site for recreation to a residential property

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7
Mar
2018
4

See historic photos from Ordnance Survey on Timepix

The Timepix historic photo site launches today and makes a unique set of photos from OS’ history available online for the first time. Over 21,000 photos catalogue the Manchester streets between the 1940s and 1960s, giving a unique insight into the city’s past captured by OS surveyors. From children and animals photobombing the surveyors, to a background of vintage adverts, Timepix showcases a fascinating collection of photos around Greater Manchester.

Why were OS surveyors photographing Manchester?

OS surveyors took revision point (RP) photos across Britain to provide a network of surveyed locations. These known spots could then be used to ‘control’ the position of detail on a large scale map. RPs were often on corners of buildings and other immovable features, and were fixed to centimetre accuracy. Finding the RPs for future map updates was an issue, and photography quickly became the best visual reference – leading to thousands of photos of men with white arrows… Read More

28
Feb
2018
8

Why retailers need quality addressing data

Guest blog by Egbe Manners, GI Consultant

One of my colleagues loves online shopping, so, when she moved to a new flat and her favourite home delivery services couldn’t find her address, she was frustrated. Increasingly having a successful delivery to her flat is becoming a differentiator to which online retailer she chooses. Is she expecting too much from online retailers?

Luckily, working at Ordnance Survey (OS), I know a bit about address data. I understand some of the challenges facing retailers to keep customer address data updated. It takes time, investment, and effort to maintain their mailing lists. However, it is worth the effort.

Having access to over 29.6 million addresses in Postal Address File (PAF) from Royal Mail, is a good starting point. However, finding those households within a building that has been divided could prove trickier. But this is made easier with the 12 million additional addresses that OS source from Britain’s local authorities.  Read More

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