Category

Using GI and maps

13
Jul
2016
0

Digimap for Schools competition winner announced

Thank you to all of the schools who entered our exciting competition with EDINA featuring Digimap for Schools and our #GetOutside champion Steve Backshall. Combining geography, wildlife and photography, it saw primary school children across Britain taking wildlife photos and plotting them on a map of their school’s area.

Some of the fantastic entries during judging

Some of the fantastic entries during judging

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11
Jul
2016
2

Britain’s most popular grid squares

You may have heard us saying that there are over 500,000 routes in our OS Maps service…well, we’ve been analysing all of that data to look at which areas you most like to #GetOutside and explore. We’ve compiled a list of the 20 most popular grid squares in Britain, using 10 years of public routing data compiled in OS Maps and its predecessors.

Britain's most popular grid squares - 18 are in the Lake District!

Britain’s most popular grid squares – 18 are in the Lake District!

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7
Jul
2016
3

Britain’s most popular routes

When we started to analyse the 500,000 plus routes in our OS Maps service, it was no surprise to us that the Lake District would top the table as the nation’s favourite place to #GetOutside. But we were also interested in the urban walks that inspire exploration. Our Cartographic Designer, Charley Glynn, extracted all of the public route information and created a series of stunning data visualisations to showcase town and city route favourites.

The ten cities and towns in Britain with the most routes in OS Maps

The ten cities and towns in Britain with the most routes in OS Maps

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5
Jul
2016
0

A new Corbett for Scotland

Guest blog by John Barnard & Graham Jackson, G&J Surveys

The most popular list of mountains in Scotland are the Munros and “Munro bagging”, that is climbing all the mountains within the list, has become a goal for many hillwalkers. This list was first compiled by Scottish Mountaineering Club (SMC) member Sir Hugh Munro and printed in the Scottish Mountaineering Club Journal in 1891. Until then it was not known how many mountains in Scotland exceeded 3,000 feet and the list caused quite a stir. The principal mountains on the list became known as Munros and since the publication of the list almost 6,000 people have recorded their ascents of all the Munros. There have been numerous revisions to the list since then, mostly through improvements to mapping and survey techniques, and the number of Munros currently stands at 282.

Coinnich

Coinnich

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4
Jul
2016
3

Recreating historic maps: interview with Charley Glynn

We recently celebrated our 225th anniversary and shared with you two new maps created by our Cartographic Design team. Chris and Charley took inspiration from map styles in our history and used current OS data to recreate the look and feel. Charley chose a 1960s map of the Western Highlands of Scotland. We catch up with him to find out how he went about the challenge.

Charley's map

Charley’s map

Tell us about the map era that you chose Read More

28
Jun
2016
2

Top 10 mapping moments in OS history

By David Henderson, Director of Products

It’s been 225 years since OS was founded and 215 years since we published our first map. I’m not sure if we could work out how many cumulative square miles we’ve surveyed in that time, but I do know there are a few highlights in our history that really stand out for me and for my cartography colleagues too.

With that in mind, this is my own top 10 of mapping moments that have recorded our nation’s evolving landscape, and helped us become the trusted geospatial partner we are today:

  1. 1801 map of Kent

Our first map. We wouldn’t be here without it. Ordnance Survey’s original purpose was to create a map that would help our military to defend and protect a nation. England’s most south-easterly county, Kent, was the area most vulnerable to French invasion, so that was our subject – highlighting the county’s communication routes, and including elaborate hill shading to interpret the landscape precisely for those men at arms.

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A section of the 1801 map of Kent

In time, this military focus would soften. Wider audiences came to appreciate and use our work. But our attention to detail has always been an asset to the armed forces: we printed 33,000,000 maps during World War I and an astonishing 342,000,000 for World War II. It wasn’t until 1983 that the last military personnel left OS, making us a wholly civilian organisation, and the War Department’s broad arrow remained in the OS logo for 21 years afterward as a nod to our military past.

  1. Early leisure maps

Think of OS maps and many people think of OS Explorer and OS Landranger, with their familiar orange and pink covers. After World War I, we marketed OS maps to a new wave of outdoor enthusiasts. A professional artist produced eye-catching covers for our one-inch maps and Ellis Martin’s classic designs boosted those sales. The iconic drawings are still popular today.

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The Lake District mapped in the late 1920s-early 1930s

Experimental maps were produced just after World War II, with the idea that students could use them to learn about geography, and by the 1970s we’d purposefully published our first Outdoor Leisure map. These early publications defined the maps we publish now to help people #GetOutside – there are 607 paper maps in the Explorer and Landranger series, all with a digital download.

  1. Aerial imagery

We’ve been using aerial photography to carry out our surveys for almost 100 years. Originally, this had the advantage of capturing information from areas that surveyors found hard to visit on foot. Today, it means we can on top of the data capture process – making continuous revisions of the whole nation’s landscape – and it may not be long before we’re surveying from the air with a range of unmanned aerial vehicles too.

MiltonKeynes_Imagery650

Milton Keynes

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27
Jun
2016
1

Recreating historic maps: interview with Christopher Wesson

Last week we celebrated our 225th anniversary and shared with you two new maps created by our Cartographic Design team. Chris and Charley took inspiration from map styles in our history and used current OS data to recreate the look and feel. Chris chose early 19th century OS maps and decided to recreate the urban environment of London. We catch up with him to find out how he went about the challenge.

Chris' London map

Chris’ London map

Tell us about the map era that you chose

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21
Jun
2016
5

Celebrating 225 years with new (old) maps!

Did you know we’re 225 years old today? On 21 June 1791, the Board of Ordnance purchased a Ramsden theodolite, now seen as the foundation of OS, to survey Britain and protect from a French invasion. Ten years later we published the first OS map of Kent and have continued to map the country and provide data for Great Britain (and beyond – did you see the Mars map?) ever since. What better way to celebrate than with two new maps, created in a historic style?

1800s Kent

1800s Kent by William Mudge

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14
Jun
2016
1

When GPS fails…could you navigate with a paper map and compass?

OS Maps app

OS Maps app

Most of us are reliant on a GPS in our day to day life – whether it’s following the reassuring voice directing us around a traffic jam or grabbing our phone for a quick check that we’re walking in the right direction in a new city. Many now rely solely on GPS for navigating in the hills too. But what happens when GPS fails? It’s something that walkers near Benbecula are likely to experience next month…

Global Positioning System (GPS) is a satellite-based navigation system owned by the US government. GPS was originally intended for military use, but in the 1980s the government made the system available for civilian use. GPS will work in most weather (although space weather can impact – see our previous blog on solar flares), across the world, 24/7. Something that we all benefit from today.

However, the military can (and do) jam GPS signals for their own priorities, such as military exercises. The communications watchdog Ofcom issued a warning recently about GPS jamming due to take place for periods between 1 and 29 July while aircraft crews train over a military range on Benbecula. In these circumstances, would you be able to navigate? Read More