25
Mar
2011
0

Moving the Osmington White Horse

With the weather taking a turn for the better, it sometimes feels like a real treat to spend a day working out of the office – much as I love our new building! Yesterday I was invited along to spend some time in the beautiful Dorset countryside working with a team from ITV West Country who were filming the work taking place on the Osmington White Horse.

The Osmington White Horse

The Osmington White Horse

The 200-year-old Weymouth monument to King George III on horseback is being renovated and returned to its original position and outline. It’s a story that has generated lots of interest among local people and ITV’s Duncan Sleighthome was keen to find out more for a local news programme.

The Osmington White Horse Society has been working on the renovation of the figure for over a year with help from Natural England and local Army and Navy units. However, Ordnance Survey and English Heritage have now been involved to make sure the outline positioning is as true to the original as possible.

The carving which is 280 feet long and 320 feet high originally took three months to complete. Although from a distance it doesn’t look that big, when you actually get up close – it’s huge and I’m not sure the photographs really do it justice! However, the integrity of the monument has been threatened with weed, scrub and weathering – not surprising really given it’s on a really steep hill and the wind blows a gale up there – even on a lovely spring day.


Read More

24
Mar
2011
0

Walk of the week: Kidwelly Quay Walk

This week we again say thank you to Ramblers Cymru for providing the route of the week. This week the route comes from Andrew Morgan from the Swansea Ramblers Group.Kidwelly Quay / Glan yr Afon Walk (2 miles / 1.5hours)

Map: OS Explorer Map 178 – Llanelli & Ammanford

Start: SN398063

Level: Moderate with some areas of mud.

Parking:From Kidwelly Town turn into minor road opposite Fishermans Arms and go past the railway station to Kidwelly Quay car park (free) Read More

17
Mar
2011
0

OS VectorMap District graduates to beta release

opendata2It won’t have escaped the notice of some of you that we’re rapidly approaching the first birthday of OS OpenData (has it really been a whole year?!) So with that in mind, we’re very pleased to be able to announce that OS VectorMap District has graduated from an alpha to a beta release and is now available to download and order.

Consider it an early birthday gift from us, to you.

OS VectorMap District made its debut as part of OS OpenData last year, designed specifically for displaying third part information on the web (like our Blitz map last year), and when in its vector format, as a customisable backdrop map. It was an alpha release and by no means the finished article, so based on your feedback the new beta version boasts new content and a range of improvements.

What’s new? Read More

17
Mar
2011
0

Walk of the week: Mynydd Mallaen walk

This week our route of the week comes with thanks to Geoffrey Williams of Ramblers Cymru.

Mynydd Mallaen walk (10 miles / 16kms)

Map: OS Explorer Map 187 – Llandovery / Llanymddyfri

Start: SN766423

  • From the Forestry Commission site north of Cilycwm go up the track through the gate for 100m – then turn left off the track and take the path up hill across Forestry hard track and continue up hill until on the level.
  • From the Forest track continue approximatley 300 metres to the stile in the fence.
  • Cross the stile and head in north-east direction through two gates heading for the gap between two woodlands through the sheep fold.
  • Pick up the old track and follow to the first standing stone and the second Maen Bach. Read More
16
Mar
2011
0

Trouble with Web Map Builder?

GeoDoctor

The GeoDoctor

In this post I’m going to focus on a particular developer issue around the use of our Web Map Builder. Questions have arisen around what you do with the code you get when you press the ‘Collect code’ button in ‘Step 4 – Generate and save code’. You are actually given a fully formed HTML document.

This is fantastic if all you want is a blank page with a map in it.

For that all I would need to do is:

1. Select all the code

2. Copy the code into a text editor, such as Notepad.

3. Save it as <name>.html, such as mymap.html.

4. Put it on my webserver

You will hopefully have something that looks like this: Read More

10
Mar
2011
0

A route with a view: South Bank, London

County Hall and the London Eye

County Hall and the London Eye

Four and a half years ago, my family and I relocated to the Isle of Wight from London. Quite a culture shock, coming from a fast paced to a gentle amble lifestyle! It took a bit of time to adjust to a quieter lifestyle, but this week I thought I’d write about my regular walks along the South Bank in London and describe the sights along the route.

Start: Embankment Tube Station
End: Butlers Wharf next to Tower Bridge
Difficulty: Easy – Flat for most of the route with a few steps.
Distance: 2.4 miles
Facilities: There are food, drink and toilet stops along the route Read More

9
Mar
2011
0

The science behind GI and mapping

Ever wondered what a career in geography could lead to? A special guest post by Tom Bramald from Newcastle University, reveals all…

“A few years ago, I was sitting talking with a group of friends about why we had chosen our particular degree courses and it pretty much boiled down to this: “I just loved looking at maps and wanted to know how they are put together”.

Geomatics!

“Our “confession” made, we went on to talk about how we had spent hours poring over Ordnance Survey maps and atlases, and in some cases had even sketched our own maps of where we lived and played.Nowadays, apps, web sites and tools such as Google Earth, Where’s the Path?, OS OpenSpace, StreetView, even the in-car sat-nav, bring GI and mapping ever closer to us.

“But what is it that allows the Ordnance Survey map to be made, Google Earth to be browsed and the sat-nav to know where it is going?

“The answer is a science called geomatics.

Read More

7
Mar
2011
0

The world’s greatest living explorer

Today on the Ordnance Survey blog we wish a very happy birthday to the man described as the worlds greatest living explorer Sir Ranulph Twisleton-Wykeham Fiennes.

Happy Birthday Sir Ranulph!

Happy Birthday Sir Ranulph!

Sir Ranulph was born on 7 March 1944. Shortly before his birth, his father was killed in action in the second world war. This meant that at birth he inherited his fathers baronetcy – becoming the third Baronet of Banbury. His early years were spent in South Africa before returning to Great Britain at the age of 12 to be educated at  Eton before joining the army where he served for eight years.

In was in the 1960’s that he became an adventurer and explorer. Some of the huge challenges that he has undertaken since then have included:

  • Being the first to reach both poles and to cross both the Antarctic and Arctic oceans – all with Charles Burton.
  • The first, with Charles Burton, to circumnavigate the world along its polar axis – something that has never since been successfully repeated.
  • Led the first hovercraft expedition up the longest river in the world – the Nile.
  • In 1990 achieved the world record for unsupported northerly pole travel.
  • Led the team that discovered the lost city of Ubar on the Yemeni border in 1992.
  • In 2003, less than 4 months after suffering a heart attack, 3 day coma and double heart bypass – he completed 7 marathons in 7 days on 7 continents.
  • In May 2009 became the oldest Briton to ever reach the summit of Mount Everest.

I had the pleasure of meeting Sir Ranulph and asked him where his favourite area of Great Britain was. Read More