27
Sep
2010
1

Vegetation map symbols

We recently came across a blog about the Ordnance Survey map symbols for rough grassland, heath and bracken and thought it would be helpful to give you an explanation on their use. Please head to the bottom of this blog to see all the symbols.

Originally bracken, rough grassland and heath were shown as separate symbols (1. bracken, 2. rough grassland  and 3. heath).  In 1976 bracken and rough grassland were amalgamated so there was just one symbol to indicate land being covered by rough grassland or bracken – it was made up of elements of both the symbols so it had some rough grass in it and some bracken (4).  Where space was tight a smaller symbol was also made incorporating both vegetation types (5).

The map symbols in the (6) legend  are shown in the following order; top left is the new amalgamated symbol for bracken and rough grassland, top right is the old bracken symbol. Bottom left is old rough grassland symbol and bottom right the heath symbol.  The heath symbol was not changed and has stayed the same.  The old symbols for bracken and rough grassland remain in the legend because there are still some sheets that have the old style individual bracken and rough grassland symbols.  The symbols were only updated on the mapping if there was a change in vegetation category so there are still large areas of old style vegetation shown on the mapping.

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24
Sep
2010
0

Maps are child’s play with Digimap for Schools

At the start of this autumn term hundreds of schools across Great Britain began the new academic year by signing up to use a new online mapping service designed specifically for the classroom.


With its pupil-friendly interface, and national coverage of digital maps, Digimap for Schools is set to greatly increase the use of Ordnance Survey maps for teaching and learning geography at all levels, as well as supporting other subjects such as history.


Until now, schools have mainly relied upon paper maps for Ordnance Survey map skills work – a mandatory topic in the curriculum. Since 2002 this has been supported by the issue of a free 1:25 000 scale OS Explorer Map to all pupils in Year 7 under the Ordnance Survey Free maps for 11-year-olds scheme. These free maps are being issued for the last time this year because Digimap for Schools will offer schools so much more.

How Digimap for Schools looks

How Digimap for Schools looks

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24
Sep
2010
0

Walking Hadrian’s Wall for George

Reading this blog hopefully shows that there are lots of interesting things happening here at Ordnance Survey. However, we also have lots of staff doing interesting things away from work.

Husband and wife team Sam and Jean Martin, who have jointly worked at Ordnance Survey for 50 years, have just returned from an 8 day expedition walking the 84 mile route of Hadrian’s Wall.

Along with their 17 year-old son and other friends and colleagues, they did it to raise money for George’s Trust – a charity set up in memory of George O’Brien, a family friend who suddenly died at age 17 from cancer which gave no warning.

Sam explains:

“George had got up one morning complaining of difficulty breathing. An hour later he was in hospital and died shortly after. He had seemed like a perfectly normal, healthy and active teenager. His death was a dreadful shock and a reminder of how fragile life is.”

The walk had taken months of planning and was an emotional journey for all those involved as several years before he died, George had vowed to walk Hadrian’s Wall to raise money for a cancer charity in memory of his grandfather who had also been struck down with the disease.

Sam and Jean Martin with friends having completed their walk.

Sam and Jean Martin with friends having completed their walk.

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21
Sep
2010
0

Connecting people to places

Research conducted 10 years ago revealed that a staggering 85% of journeys within the UK were made by car. In line with Government targets to reduce road congestion and make services available online, an ambitious project to change national travel habits was born.

Road network

Road network

The result was Transport Direct, a website which knits together disparate strands of data to provide easy to use, comprehensive door-to-door travel information under the tag line ‘Connecting people to places’. Covering travel by both car and public transport around Britain, it now provides all the information needed to plan a journey, all in one place.

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20
Sep
2010
0

Ordnance Survey could solve South Downs debate

On 12 November 2009, the South Downs were confirmed as a National Park by Hilary Benn, the then Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs.  It took some years to decide on the boundary of the park and several revisions were made.

South Downs Way sign post

South Downs Way sign post

The first designation was in 2000 and the final report was submitted in 2008 after several disputes over which towns should be included in the National Park. The park stretches from the eastern edge of Winchester in the west, up to Binsted in the north and in a south-easterly direction Beachy Head near Eastbourne is the boundary.

Now a new dispute over which town is at the very centre of the park has begun.

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17
Sep
2010
0

Aerial imagery: A bird’s-eye view

OS MasterMap is our flagship product family, but have you ever wondered how a photo taken by a plane makes it onto a computer screen as a piece of data? Photogrammetry is the science of measuring and interpreting objects from photographs to answer questions like how high is that feature?

Remote Sensing is the process of acquiring information without coming into physical contact with the subject under investigation. We use this process, in conjunction with ground-based revision by our field surveyors, to update our large-scale databases

We have a large contract in place with external suppliers to supplement our own flying and photogrammetric production.This gives us the capacity to have to 6 planes flying on our behalf at any one time, allowing us to make best use of good weather conditions and process 60 000 to 70 000 sq km (more than a quarter) of Great Britain each year.

An image taken by one of our digital cameras

An image taken by one of our digital cameras

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15
Sep
2010
0

Ordnance Survey and Exercise Orion

Buckled roads, collapsed buildings, destroyed power lines and trapped, injured and isolated civilians in desperate need of help.

That was the scenario played out across the country last week as part of Exercise Orion, an national disaster scenario designed to push the country’s emergency services to the very limit.

In the context of the imagined catastrophe, with a huge amount of information to process, understand and act upon, having a clear picture of the unfolding crisis was absolutely vital. That was why experts from Ordnance Survey were called upon to join the very heart of the operation and provide a geographic context to the unfolding events.

Four of our GI experts were deployed to command centres across the country in response to a call to our ‘Mapping For Emergencies’ hotline. They worked with the disaster management teams, providing them with an analysis on how the ‘earthquakes’ had impacted on electric, water and gas supplies, how the emergency services could be routed whilst avoiding impassable roads; and how best to evacuate civilians based on the location of the most vulnerable.

Rescuing a casualty from a collapsed apartment block

Rescuing a casualty from a collapsed apartment block

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