30
Mar
2017
0

It’s a stitch up! OS has Great Britain all sewn up

Using a wide range of techniques, our talented Craft Club have created a fantastic Great British Craftography Mapand we’re putting it up for auction to raise money for Solent Mind, our corporate charity. The crafty individuals recreated the Ordnance Survey National Grid into a 2.2m by 1.2m wall hanging. And you can now bid for the unique, mappy piece of art in an online charity auction.

OS Craft Club with their creation

OS Craft Club with their creation

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30
Mar
2017
0

Mappy makeover at Solent Mind

We’re at Solent Mind‘s Eastleigh Wellbeing Centre today to officially open their newly-refurbished training room, with our CEO Nigel Clifford and Solent Mind CEO Kevin Gardner on hand to cut the ribbon. A fantastic team of OS volunteers had donned their decorating overalls to transform the once dull room into a clean, energising environment which can now be used by staff, volunteers, and service users.

The OS team working on Solent Mind’s training room

As part of the makeover our team not only decorated the room but helped install new blinds, carpet, furniture, storage and artwork including a creative finger print painting from OS staff. The room wouldn’t have been complete without a map, so one of the final touches came when the team hung an OS Custom Made map canvas centred on the building. Read More

29
Mar
2017
0

Mapping Superdiversity

Guest blog by OS-sponsored PhD student Katherine Stansfeld at University of London

Superdiversity is a concept which recognises that cities are becoming ever more diverse, complex and unpredictable. But how can OS respond to the ever-shifting multicultural city?

Through my PhD research, based around Finsbury Park, a neighbourhood in north-east London, I’ve discovered the power and potential of mapping to explore and investigate the meanings of places in diverse contexts. Using interviewing, visual ethnography and participatory mapping, the research explores vernacular geographies; the everyday ways places are talked about, lived and experienced. This allows an investigation of how lives and trajectories overlap in the area, finding what is shared and what is different. The research conceptualizes place as radically open, shifting and multiple and employs mapping as a tool to explore the connections and plurality in the superdiverse city. Read More

21
Mar
2017
0

How to map a new country?

March 24 sees the UK film release of Lost City of Z. It chronicles the South American adventures of British explorer, cartographer and archaeologist Lt Colonel Percy Fawcett. I joined a panel discussion in London last week, along with historian Dan Snow and Lost City of Z author David Grann, discussing how Percy would have explored and mapped a new land. Catch up on the podcast here.

Dan, David and Mark

A member of the Royal Geographical Society (RGS), Percy Fawcett first arrived in South American in 1906 to survey and map an area of jungle lying on the Brazil and Bolivian border. The border between the two countries was not fully mapped and it was agreed that an RGS survey and map would be accepted as an impartial representation of the border. Today we would complete this activity using satellite systems and sophisticated surveying technology, which obviously wasn’t available back then. So, how would Percy and his team have gone about making maps? Read More

15
Mar
2017
2

7 fantastic things about #TrigPillar80

When we decided to celebrate the 80th anniversary of the trig pillar last year, we had no idea how strongly so many of you felt about the (mostly) concrete pillars dotted around Britain. We’ve had over 1,200 Instagram posts, uncovered dozens of trig baggers, seen Rob Woodall complete his 13-year mission to bag all 6,190 and had hundreds of people, magazines and websites share stories throughout the year.

With 18 April fast-approaching, #TrigPillar80 is drawing to a close, and #TrigPillar81 doesn’t have quite the same ring to it. So, huge thanks to everyone who took part and keep sharing your trig pillar love with us. Here are 7 fantastic things about trig pillars in case you missed all of the celebrations this year: Read More

13
Mar
2017
0

Keep one step ahead at GEO Business 2017 – the fastest growing geospatial event in the industry

Guest blog by Geo Business

Join over 3,000 visitors from more than 50 countries at the highly anticipated and action-packed GEO Business event, due to take place at the Business Design Centre in London from 23-25 May.

Not only are the exhibition, associated meetings and commercial workshops free to attend, but the conference delegate fee has been kept to an absolute minimum from just £30* per day. Accessible for all, GEO Business encourages knowledge transfer and networking keeping visitor’s one step ahead in this fast moving industry.

Register online today and be a part of:

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9
Mar
2017
2

What lies below? Can you help create international standards?

Guest blog by Andy Ryan, Senior Technical Product Manager

gv3When I go somewhere new, I usually look up a map (OS of course) before I go. I’m not quite sure why I do, but it’s a habit of mine which my children tease me about. In the world of business, when location is involved then you probably do the same, often without realising it. Using a sat nav to route a delivery van, ascertaining if a house you want to buy is on a flood plain, reviewing a site for a new development, or planning some underground pipe replacement all involve ‘maps’. But what if the map was blank or only partially complete, or you had to ask lots of other different people to send you bits of information that you had to stick together and even then you were not quite sure if it was complete?

When you need to work under the ground this is how it can feel. Lots of organisations have information, but it can be hard to share the information quickly and to common standards. This creates delays, unanticipated disruptions, extra costs and danger to those working in these areas. This is a widely recognised problem and the direct costs to the UK of accidental damage to utilities alone has been estimated at £150 million, with associated indirect costs, such as traffic disruption, of ten times this*. If other potential costs or savings are factored in, for example assessing the potential of brownfield sites, identifying infrastructure at risk from subsidence or tree roots, then the benefits of a map that includes what lies below ground increases significantly. The Treasury estimate that greater cross-sector collaboration with infrastructure networks across GB could save the economy £3 billion#Read More