Tag

adanac park

15
Jul
2011
0

Going green at Adanac Park

Before we moved into our new head office, I wrote about how we hoped to make it as environmentally friendly as we could. So, we have a BREEAM ‘Excellent’ rated building, but what has this actually contributed to the lowering of Ordnance Survey’s carbon footprint?

The building was designed to be energy efficient, with minimal impact on the environment. The combination of measures, such as sensor controlled lighting and natural ventilation, means that there has been a big reduction in the energy we use at head office. In our last full year at Romsey Road, our total energy demand was over 20 million kWh. Even though we purchased green electricity from the grid and produced renewable heat and power from our own combined heat and power unit, that still created a carbon footprint of 6 616 tonnes of CO2.

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4
Mar
2011
0

Cartography – from past to present

Following on from last week’s article on the wide range of work our cartographers cover, we started thinking about how cartography has changed over the years. We have a number of team members who have recently moved to our new head office at Adanac Park, and have also worked at our previous two Southampton bases, at Romsey Road and London Road, spanning more than 40 years. I caught up with John to find out a bit more… if you have any memories about cartography at Ordnance Survey, let us know.

“My time at Ordnance Survey started with a training course on 25 January 1966 with me earning the princely sum of £446 per annum. After a few weeks we moved from to the training drawing sections at London Road. The building had been caught in the blitz in 1941 and was a shadow of its former self. At this point in time it still felt like a military organisation with military personnel occupying all of the top management positions.

Cartographer applying building stipple film to one of the original enamel positives. There is a surveyor's BJ plate by her left elbow, and a ruling pen. Applying building stipple like this was eventually replaced by cutting the buildings out of a 'cut and strip' mask to match what had been scribed.

Cartographer applying building stipple film to one of the original enamel positives. There is a surveyor’s BJ plate by her left elbow, and a ruling pen. Applying building stipple like this was eventually replaced by cutting the buildings out of a ‘cut and strip’ mask to match what had been scribed.

My cartography skills started with the ruling pen. We would draw a 7/1000 inch gauge line in black ink onto enamel. We were working on enamel coated zinc plates on which an image of the surveyor’s work had been printed in a light blue aniline die, at 1:1 250 map scale. Map symbols and text were added to the enamel and the finished article was used to make the printing plate At that point the zinc plate would be stripped of the old enamel image and re-enamelled to be used again.  Read More

14
Jan
2011
0

To infinity and beyond…with food waste

What do River Cottage and the Royal Air Force have in common with us at Ordnance Survey? The A700 Rocket composter.

Huw and Gwen from Tidy Planet came in recently to do some training for our new industrial composter, so in the future we’ll be composting all our food waste. At our ‘tea points’ around the building there are compost bins and any food waste from our Restaurant will also be included. Before you know it, all our waste will become lovely compost to spread onto our grounds at Adanac Park.

The A700 Rocket composter - image courtesy of Tidy Planet

The A700 Rocket composter – image courtesy of Tidy Planet

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8
Jun
2010
0

Bronze Age farm discovered at OS head office

I met up with Wessex Archaeology recently to find out about the previous residents at Adanac Park, the site of our new head office.

Back in 2008, as part of the planning process, Wessex Archaeology were asked to investigate the site for historical interest. They were fairly confident of finding some archaeological remains as there had been finds at sites in the local area, but were surprised to find evidence of a late Bronze Age farm, the first of its kind in this part of Hampshire.

Archaeologist Andrew Fitzpatrick told me, ‘The site proved to be late Bronze Age, around 3,000 years old, four or five houses and evidence of smaller structures, such as storage sheds and granaries. There was also an Iron Age burial ground with seven barrows and other graves. This was quite unexpected and the site is unique in Britain.’ Read More