Tag

data visualisation

11
Aug
2020
1

Britain’s top walking spots since lockdown eased

In the months since lockdown restrictions around Great Britain began to be relaxed in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, Britons valued the chance to GetOutside. During that time, subscribers to OS Maps have logged almost 700,000 routes in the app, showing whereabouts in the country they’ve been outdoors.

We’ve analysed the data to identify some Britain’s top walking spots since lockdown eased. Read More

12
May
2020
9

A different perspective on the Highlands with OS OpenData 

Guest blog by Alasdair Rae, University of Sheffield 

Thanks to the new Ordnance Survey Data Hub, it’s easier than ever for users to get their hands on the treasure trove of geographic data covering the length and breadth of Britain. In this article, I’ll explain how I used some of Ordnance Survey’s digital terrain model data to create a new map of the Scottish Highlands. I will also say a bit about the software and methods, and I’ve shared the data below so anyone who is interested can try it for themselves. But before that, let’s take a look back at the first ‘3D map’ of the Highlands.   

Extract of Alasdair Rae's Highlands map showing the Cairngorms

The first ‘3D map’ of the Highlands 

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9
Jan
2020
12

The GeoDataViz team’s favourite maps of 2019

Mappy New Year! 2019 was a great year for cartography, especially geo data visualisation. We loved seeing such amazing maps and visuals being produced by some very talented people, and the standard just seems to be getting better and better. Inspired by all the brilliant work we’ve seen, we thought we’d pull together some of our favourites. There are too many to include so this list is by no means exhaustive, but we hope you enjoy our picks.

Surfing Saco Bay, Margot Carpenter

Created by independent cartographer Margot Carpenter, this stunning map depicts Maine’s Saco Bay. The detail is incredible, and we love how the map focuses on the bay’s underwater topography and wave dynamics and how they fuel the bays amazing surfing conditions. There is also a beautiful compass rose that illustrates wave height and a visualisation depicting how bathymetry and waves create surf!

Margot Carpenter's map. Read More

17
Oct
2019
4

LEGO cartography

As a self-proclaimed outdoor enthusiast, it’s no surprise our guest blogger Dan Harris is a Forward Planning Manager at the Cairngorms National Park Authority. In his spare time, he used our data to create a 3D LEGO map and in doing so, enthused many Twitter users. Here, he tells us about the project…

LEGO is an extremely engaging medium that can generate great enthusiasm in almost any subject, whether the audience is young or old. There are hundreds of examples of its use to promote subjects such as history, philosophy, economics, science and more, so I wanted to bring it to the world of cartography and use it to inspire engagement with mapping, landscape and place.

I’ve always really liked the way 3D relief maps can quickly and often dramatically convey the geography of an area. They’re popular and inspiring so to me, LEGO seemed like the ideal material from which to make my own; and where better to make one for than Scotland? With its mountains, islands and intricate coastline, it seemed to me to be the ideal subject. Plus, I live there and if it’s going to be displayed in my house, I want it to mean something to me.

One of my main objectives was to make the map using open data, so OS’s open datasets were an obvious solution. While I did consider other options, I decided that OS Terrain 50 DTM best suited my needs. To be fair, OS Terrain 50 is total excessive for a model of the resolution I had planned, but I wanted to use it so that in future I could create more detailed maps without having to process loads of new data. My map also includes a part of Northern Ireland, so I used the ALOS World 30m DSM to fill in that gap. Watercourses data came from the OS Open Zoomstack dataset, which is a great source of open data. Read More

16
Jul
2019
6

Britain’s most complex motorway junctions 

By Lucie Woellenstein, Graduate Data Scientist 

Did you know that there are 50 motorways in Great Britain with over 8,300 km of roads and a whopping 666 junctions? How many junctions have you takenOr will you be taking as you head off for the summer holidays? Ever tried to come off a motorway junction, only to find you’ve taken the wrong exit and are now heading in the wrong direction? Maybe you’ve driven through the famous ‘Spaghetti Junction’ in Birmingham, and wondered what it looks like from above? Or perhaps you’ve been perplexed at how the most complex of junctions somehow actually work?  

Well here at Ordnance Survey, weve spent many hours over the years thinking about the interwoven laces of motorway junctionsNot from the perspective of a driver, but that of a cartographer. From data architects conceptually modelling how to capture data, to surveyors capturing the exact GPS locations of our roads, and to the cartographers that digitise the maps you use to travel along the motorways – a lot of thought goes into how to cartographically represent junctions in a way they make sense to the map reader.  

Cartographically complex motorway junctions 

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12
Mar
2019
7

Data visualisations show Britain’s most trodden paths

Our OS Maps users created over 300,000 public routes across Great Britain in 2018 (covering some 2,950,000 miles…) and we were curious to see where you most (and least) enjoy exploring. Our Data Scientist Andrew Radburn set to work analysing the data before our Data Visualisation expert Charley Glynn set to work to showcase the results.

Data visualisation showing the OS Maps routes across Great Britain

Analysing OS Maps route data

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28
Nov
2018
9

Tutorial – visualising data in Tableau with the RNLI

So far, we have looked at visualising Royal National Lifeboat Institute and Ordnance Survey data using QGIS and Kepler software. In this, our third technical blog, we will be using Tableau.

Tableau is a data visualisation software that is used for creating a wide range of different visualisation to interactively present data and obtain insights. It has a very intuitive user interface and you don’t need any coding knowledge to work with it. For this tutorial we will be using Tableau Public which can be downloaded here.

We will be creating a spider map or origin-destination map that shows paths between our origins (RNLI stations) and destinations (call-outs). All the data you will need for this tutorial can be found here.

Within this data folder there is a CSV file called tableau_finished which was created using a combination of the RNLI_Return_of_Service_20082006.csv and RNLI_Lifeboat_Station_Locations.csv. Read More

21
Nov
2018
8

Tutorial – visualising data in Kepler with the RNLI

On 28 February 1823, Sir William Hillary made an impassioned appeal to the nation, calling for a service dedicated to saving lives at sea. That service was to become the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI).

Did you know?

  • There are 238 lifeboat stations around the coasts of Great Britain, Ireland, the Isle of Man and Channel Islands.
  • Tower Lifeboat Station on the River Thames in London is the RNLI’s busiest.
  • There are 349 lifeboats in the RNLI fleet.
  • The RNLI have 4,966 volunteers.
  • It cost £176.5m to run the RNLI in 2017.

Last week we looked at using QGIS to create some visualisations using data from the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) and Ordnance Survey. This week we will be taking the same datasets and working with them within Kepler, Uber’s new open source geospatial analysis tool.

KEPLER (Pt 1)

Kepler is great for creating a range of different visualisations easily and quickly, and to begin with we are going to look at creating a visualisation depicting where in the UK most emergency call-outs are made. To do this we will need to download the RNLI Return of Service data.

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14
Nov
2018
3

Tutorial – visualising data in QGIS with the RNLI

In an emergency the importance of location is critical. Knowing the precise whereabouts of an incident can be the difference between life and death.

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) are the charity that saves lives at sea. Responsible for saving over 140,000 lives since their formation in 1824 they work with a dedicated team of volunteers, staff and community fundraisers. They allow us to enjoy our shorelines and water, safe in the knowledge that in an emergency they will be there to assist us.

There is a lot of data behind the lifesaving and in 2017 RNLI teamed up with ESRI to create an open data portal to help share some of this data.

Find out how to create a data visualisation like this using QGIS

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