Tag

Munros

15
Nov
2013
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The Skye Cuillin – Britain’s most difficult mountain survey

John Barnard on one of the two summits of Knight's Peak.  Photo Taken by:  Alan DawsonFollowing on from the success of Britain’s new mountain back in April this year, we have a guest post from Myrddyn Phillips on his latest mountainous challenge.

The Cuillin Mountains of Skye in the Highlands of Scotland are renowned as having the most challenging mountain environment anywhere in Britain.  These mountains contain narrow, complicated ridges where a day’s outing can require a mountaineer’s skill and knowledge to overcome their difficulties.

Picture: John Barnard on one of the two summits of Knight’s Peak. Photo taken by: Alan Dawson

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19
Aug
2013
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Knight’s Peak – Britain’s most difficult mountain survey

Following on from the success of Britain’s new mountain back in April this year, we have a guest post from Myrddyn Phillips on his next mountainous challenge.

Balanced precariously on the aptly named Pinnacle Ridge in the Cuillin Mountains of  Skye in the Highlands of Scotland is a lump of rock that may well prove to offer the most difficult mountain survey ever conducted in Britain.

The mountain in question is Knight’s Peak (grid reference NG 471 254).  Its summit is situated amongst castellated peaks in the most challenging and dramatic mountain range Britain has to offer.

The summit of Knight’s Peak consists of two tops a short distance apart.  One top is spacious enough for one person to balance on its highest point, whilst the other is a pointed top where standing is not advised.  The land beyond the summit area is precipitous.

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12
Dec
2012
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Munro bagging – Driesh and Mayar

Guest post by Ordnance Survey’s Gwyn Hughes-Jones

This walk uses OS Explorer Map –  388 Lochnagar, Glen Muick and Glen Clova.

This is a great walk taking in 2 of the most easterly Munros: Driesh (947m) and Mayar (928m).  These 2 Munros lie just inside the Cairngorms National Park in the Angus glens. The 2 hills are typical of many in the Cairngorms with a pudding shape and grassy slopes. They are ideal for beginners to hill walking and dog walkers, and are easily accessible from Dundee.

This walk starts from the Forestry Commision car park at NO 282 761. The car park is situated at the Glen Doll visitor centre and is a reasonable £2 for all day parking. Sadly the visitor centre does not appear to have a café so no bacon rolls to start the walk(!), but they do have toilets!

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21
Nov
2012
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Munro bagging – Ben Vorlich and Stuc a’ Chroin

This walk uses OS Explorer Map 365 – The Trossachs.

This 8 mile (13KM) walk takes in 2 Munros: Ben Vorlich (985m) and  Stuc a’ Chroin (975m). This is a great route which encorporates 2 iconic Scottish Mountains; there is an easy path up to BenVorlich , then a scramble up to Stuc a’ Chroin, and another easy path back down.  These Munros are very accessible and there are routes available to suit all abilities, including options that miss out the tricky scramble to Stuc a’ Chroin.

The walk starts out at Ardvorlich House (NN 629 230). There is ample parking available along the grass verge of the approach road to the House.

Follow the track from Ardvorlich House for 2km as it meanders steadily up Glen Vorlich following the route of the Ardvorlich Burn. At this point you reach a footbridge across the Allt a’Choire Bhuidhe, follow the path for just over 2km as it gains height and ascends the shoulder of Sgiath nam Tarmachan towards the top of Ben Vorlich. The path does get a little bit steeper as you approach the top.

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29
Aug
2012
0

Munro bagging – the Drumochter Pass

Guest blog by Ordnance Survey’s Gwyn Hughes-Jones

This walk is just off the A9 near the summit of Drumochter Pass; it takes in three Munros: Sgairneach Mhor (991M), Beinn Udlamain (1011M) and A’Mharconaich (975M).  You should be using OS Explorer Map 393 – Ben Alder, Loch Ericht and Loch Laggan.

Start at layby 81 on the A9. (If you are lucky the Bacon Buttie Van will be there, and I can highly recommend the black pudding bap at £1.50!)  To begin the walk, follow the track down the A9 for 800m until you reach a farm gate and the old road. Take the old road for 300m until you reach a fork, here you should bear right passing under the railway.

Follow the right track, as it gradually climbs up Coire Dhomhain, for just over two kilometres until you get to the second new bridge which passes over the Allt Coire Dhomhain.  Follow the remains of a Landrover track up the side of Sgairneach Mhor until you reach the shoulder. Once on the shoulder, it is an easy 600m up to the trig point and the remains of a shelter.

At the trig point, take a bearing South West and follow it for 600m; then take another bearing towards the remains of a fence on the shoulder of Beinn Udlamain. The ground initially dips down to 809m before a short ascent to gain the fence line at 860m.  Follow the remains of this fence for about 1.2 kilomertres. It is quite an easy ascent to the top of Beinn Udlamain and on a clear day you can get great views of Loch Ericht and Ben Nevis in the distance.

Continue to follow the fence line as it heads North East towards A’Mharconaich. After 1.5 kilometre the path drops down into a cwm at 861m. As you start the ascent up A’Mharconaich, follow the right hand path which, after approx 1km, will take you to the top (975m). This is a grassy knoll marked with a cairn.

If you have time you can reach another munro from this hill, Geal-charn (917m) or, to return to the car, head back to the fence line and follow this down the hill as you zig zag slowly back to the track in Coire Dhomhain.  Then follow the track back to the A9 and layby 81.

6
Jun
2012
0

Munro bagging in Glen Lyon

Guest blog by Ordnance Survey’s Gwyn Hughes-Jones

This walk starts from the car park in Inverar at NN666 482 and uses OS Explorer Map 378.  The car park is on the left hand side of the road just before the telephone box.  Before setting out, it is worth checking the Hill phones website which provides information on any deer stalking in the area: http://www.snh.org.uk/hillphones/.

This walk is 12 miles long and takes in four Munros in Glen Lyon: Carn Gorm (1028m), Meall Garbh (968m), Carn Mairg (1041m) and Meall nan Aighean (981m).

From the car park, cross the road and take the track to the left of the barn: this meanders through the forest for 300m. (Watch out for the rather high stiles with no protection.)

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14
Sep
2011
0

Bagging Munros, Peaks and the Wainwrights

Do you know your Wainwrights from your Hardys?

Do you know your Wainwrights from your Hardys? You will after reading the blog today!

On your outdoor adventures have you come across people who claim to have “bagged” Wainwrights, Munros, Grahams or Peaks? Have you wondered what they were talking about? Today on the Ordnance Survey blog I aim to explain what they all mean! If you don’t know your Marilyns from your Munros or your Wainwrights from your Hardys – read on!

  • Bagging
    This term means – a hill walker / climber / mountaineer attempting to reach the summit of a collection of hills / peaks.

The collection of hills or peaks that are “bagged” could be one of the following …

  • Munros
    These are all the Scottish hills / peaks that are over 3 000ft. The list on Munros was originally set by Sir Hugh Munro in 1891 but has since been revised by the Scottish Mountaineering Club. There are 283 Munros to be bagged with an additional 227 subsidiary Munro Tops listed that meet the height requirement but aren’t deemed to be separate enough from others to stand alone. Read More