Tag

National Trust

2
Nov
2017
6

Trodden paths with National Trust and OS Maps

By Richard Martin, GIS Analyst at the National Trust

As keen followers of the OS blog, we found the ‘trodden paths’ post in August of particular interest. The National Trust (NT) is a charity founded in 1895 by three people who saw the importance of our nation’s heritage and open spaces and wanted to preserve them for everyone to enjoy. We were therefore interested in discovering how much NT land currently occupies the most popular OS 1km map tiles that contain the largest number of public routes going through them. We were delighted to find that within the OS top 20 tiles (2,000ha) the NT looks after 924ha (46%), showing a very strong correlation with the places that OS Maps subscribers most like to walk.

 

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30
Oct
2015
1

Mapping our shores: 50 years of Land Use Change at our coast

Guest blog by Huw Davies, Head of Conservation Information, National Trust

In 1965, concerned about the impact of development along the coast of England, Wales and Northern Ireland, the National Trust launched ‘Enterprise Neptune’ to help raise money to buy and protect the most ‘pristine’ stretches. There was particular concern about caravan parks, shacks, sprawling industrialisation and the defence relics left over from the war.

In order to understand which areas were most at risk from development, the Neptune committee commissioned John Whittow at the University of Reading to produce a ground-breaking land use survey on a scale not seen since the Dudley Stamp survey of the 1930s. It was a massive undertaking, but during the wet and windy summer of 1965 undergraduate students and staff walked the whole coastline mapping detailed land use classes onto 350 OS 2.5 miles to 1 inch scale maps, along with some lovely value-laden annotations that reflected the feeling of threat at the time.

Great Orme and Llandudno mapped in the 1960s

Great Orme and Llandudno mapped in the 1960s

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8
Jul
2015
0

Map the #shoresounds for National Trust

By Mike Collins from the National Trust

Whenever I head down to the North Cornwall coast one of the things that I always make sure that I’ve packed is the OS Explorer 106 map. It’s a well-thumbed and much-loved edition now as we’ve been down to this beautiful stretch of coast in a county full of wonderful coastline many times.

Doyden N.T. Cottage at Doyden Point, Port Quin, overlooking Padstow Bay. This area between Polzeath and Port Quin covers six miles of dramatic coastline with sheltered bays & coves.

Doyden N.T. Cottage at Doyden Point, Port Quin, overlooking Padstow Bay. This area between Polzeath and Port Quin covers six miles of dramatic coastline with sheltered bays & coves.

Like so many people going on holiday as soon as I arrive at my destination I carefully unfold the map of the place that I’m staying, usually on the table in the kitchen, to get my bearings. It might mean getting to know somewhere new or starting to re-acquaint myself with the contours of the landscape that feels so familiar; in this case the craggy coastal cliffs around Port Isaac or the sweeping beauty of the Camel estuary. Read More

5
Apr
2012
0

Putting Foxbury on the landscape

Last week a team of outdoor enthusiasts from the Ordnance Survey Research Department rolled up their sleeves to help the National Trust raise the profile of a newly opened area of the New Forest National Park.

The team were given the challenge to create a huge sign saying ‘Foxbury’ from cut birch logs on a hill side in the New Forest National Park. The hillside sign will publicise the 370 acre area of the New Forest National Park that has been acquired, and is now being managed by, the National Trust. The Foxbury area was formerly a plantation and was about to be turned into landfill when the National Trust stepped in and rescued it. The area is now being restored to heathland and deciduous woodland, and a dedicated recreation space for walkers, cyclists and horse riders.

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