Tag

Ordnance Survey

1
May
2018
2

25 years since the last OS benchmark

You may know about our trig pillars, but did you know that there are more nostalgic reminders of how we used to map Great Britain?

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Have you ever seen one of these while you’ve been out and about? If so, it is highly likely you have spotted one of our renowned benchmarks. 2018 marks 25 years since the last traditionally-cut arrow style benchmark was carved on a milestone located outside The Fountain pub in Loughton.

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26
Apr
2018
3

Where does the rainwater go?

Technical Director of our partners centremapslive.com and this week’s guest blogger, Andrew Terry reports on the topic of rainwater and the SuDS legislation.

Over the last few months, I’ve been watching a new housing development being built near my home. It’s always interesting to see new communities appearing in previously open land and in this case, close to wetland areas and flood plains around Tewkesbury.

While I admire the civil engineering techniques used to create the housing infrastructure, it prompts me to think about the impact of surface water on this development, especially as it is overlooking the floodplain.

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23
Apr
2018
1

Data Month: GeoDataViz

Early in 2018 Ordnance Survey (OS) were approached by the Registers of Scotland (RoS) to support their Data Month, an internal event for RoS staff held in March to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and best practice across the business. RoS is the non-ministerial government department responsible for compiling and maintaining 18 public registers. These relate to land, property, and other legal documents and include the Land Register of Scotland and General Register of Sasines. Read More

16
Apr
2018
1

Was Chester the intended capital of Roman Britain?

Inspired by a previous blog post that re-imagined Winchester as the nation’s capital through mapping, guest blogger John Murray applied this technique to Chester.

There has been much speculation amongst historians and archaeologists on whether Roman Chester (Deva) was intended to be the capital of Britannia.

This was the subject of a BBC Two Timewatch programme (Britain’s Lost Colosseum) from 2005 and, more recently, in Professor Alice Roberts’ Britain’s Most Historic Towns programme about Roman Chester.

During an archaeological dig in 1939, the remains of a substantial elliptical building were discovered immediately to the dextral rear (north west) of the headquarters building (Principia).

The map below shows the approximate location of these buildings. The elliptical building would have been approximately where the present-day Chester Market Hall is located.

Location of Principia and Elliptical Building overlaid on OS Open Map-Local with present day city walls.

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4
Apr
2018
4

OS Maps has a new 3D fly-through feature

Keswick Mountain Festival trail run.

Following the Easter indulgence, we’re releasing a new feature for OS Maps – the 3D fly-through. Perfect for planning GetOutside adventures with your friends and family or for justifying your chocolate consumption (just us?), you can visualise your whole route before you start your trip.

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22
May
2017
5

Premier League map art

The 2016/17 English Football Premier League season is over and what a great season it has been.

Chelsea are champions for the sixth time while Sunderland, Middlesbrough and Hull have been relegated. Tottenham Hotspur say a fond farewell to White Hart Lane after 118 years and finish the season in second. West Ham started life at the London Stadium and finished the season in a respectable 11th place.

To mark the end of the season, the GeoDataViz team have created a one-off visual of all 20 locations for each of the Premier League stadiums. Each of the stadiums have been mapped using OS Open-Map Local and styled using the team colours.

Have a look for your favourite team below in the final league table or view and download a poster of all 20 stadium locations.

The 2016/17 Premier League Table

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1
Jul
2014
0

Celebrating our French connection

William Roy plaque near Oxford CircusToday marks the anniversary of the death of Major General William Roy, a man of enormous importance in the history of Ordnance Survey. He is honoured with a Blue Plaque at his former home in Argyll Street, Soho. The building is now home to a branch of French Connection, something which raised a little smile for us as there is a French connection with William Roy.

Born in 1726, the hugely far-sighted Scottish military engineer and surveyor understood the strategic importance of maps very early on and when King George II commissioned a military survey of the Scottish highlands in 1746, in response to the Jacobite uprising a year before, Roy became involved. William Roy worked without a military commission until 1755, but was then promoted steadily in recognition of his talents. His technical drawings showing the phases of a battle were adopted as the standard across the military and saw him promoted to a Captain in the Corps of Highlanders. He later advanced to Engineer-Director of military surveys in Great Britain and eventually the Director of Royal Engineers in 1783, after achieving the rank of Major-General in 1781. Read More

15
May
2014
0

Did you know we re-mapped around 6,000 square miles of the Western Front in WW1?

WWI-image-1-300x213

As some of you may know, far from our traditional image as the publisher of leisure maps for ramblers and cyclists exploring idyllic countryside, where the only disturbance is the rustle of a cagoule or the whir of a freewheel, Ordnance Survey’s origins are associated with preparation for war and we played a major role in the mapping of the First World War battlefields.

We blogged on the topic back in February and have also written about our efforts in both World Wars in the past. After our February article The National Archives got in touch and asked if we’d write a guest blog for them. Of course, we were more than happy to and the post was published this week. Read it on the history of government blog hereRead More

17
Jan
2014
0

Ordnance Survey Welsh site launched

We are pleased to announce that in line with the launch of our new website we have also created a scaled back Welsh language version to enable Welsh speakers to access key areas of our content. The Welsh site covers areas such as our Business products, Partner programme and Map Shop. Visitors are able to obtain high level information in Welsh before accessing the main Ordnance Survey site via direct links to the relevant areas.

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