Tag

trig pillar

15
Mar
2017
0

7 fantastic things about #TrigPillar80

When we decided to celebrate the 80th anniversary of the trig pillar last year, we had no idea how strongly so many of you felt about the (mostly) concrete pillars dotted around Britain. We’ve had over 1,200 Instagram posts, uncovered dozens of trig baggers, seen Rob Woodall complete his 13-year mission to bag all 6,190 and had hundreds of people, magazines and websites share stories throughout the year.

With 18 April fast-approaching, #TrigPillar80 is drawing to a close, and #TrigPillar81 doesn’t have quite the same ring to it. So, huge thanks to everyone who took part and keep sharing your trig pillar love with us. Here are 7 fantastic things about trig pillars in case you missed all of the celebrations this year: Read More

23
Aug
2016
0

#TrigPillar80 competition now closed

We have genuinely loved seeing all of the fantastic trig pillar photos that you’ve been sharing with us as we celebrate the 80th year of the trig. Across Twitter and Instagram you’ve sent in an amazing 1,656 entries of trigs across Britain. We highly recommend going and checking some of the entries out.

Our final winners have been picked and all of our T-shirts have now been given away. Check out the final winners below, and see all of the winners in our blog post.

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3
Aug
2016
0

#GetOutside with some trig-bagging this summer

Worcestershire Beacon photo by #GetOutside champion Dan Grant

Worcestershire Beacon photo by #GetOutside champion Dan Grant

Hands up if you’re looking for some free family activities over the summer holidays? We thought so…how about a spot of trig bagging to get the family outside? This year we’ve been celebrating the 80th anniversary of the trig pillar, those concrete pillars that are often found at the top of hills and create a handy photo opportunity.

Once a key part of our surveying network, and since superseded by GNSS, they stand tall and mark the summit of many a walk. With around 6,000 still standing around Britain you stand a fair chance of spotting one when you’re out exploring, and you can spot them on your map as the small blue triangle with a dot in the centre. Read More

20
May
2016
1

Geocaching for #TrigPillar80

We’ve been thrilled at your response to our #TrigPillar80 celebrations over the last month and are loving looking at all of the photos you’ve been sharing with us on Twitter and Instagram. We’ve also heard from some of you who are on a trig bagging challenge. Here, Gerry McGarry tells us more about his geocaching and trig adventures…

Gerry and friend!

Gerry and friend!

Over the last couple of years, I have visited geocaches that have been hidden close to trig pillars. This led me to investigate trig pillars and I discovered some interesting sites on the internet, especially trigpointingUK. I then discovered that there is more to old Ordnance Survey markers than the pillars and encountered bolts, rivets and other interesting OS markers. Close to the end of 2015, I noticed that I had found 85 pillars during that year and I upped my game and bagged exactly 100 pillars during 2015. Read More

19
Apr
2016
2

A history of the trig pillar

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The trig pillar network

Yesterday marked 80 years since the trig pillar was first used in the retriangulation of Great Britain on 18 April 1936. On that day, a group of surveyors gathered around a white concrete pillar in a field in Cold Ashby and began the retriangulation of Great Britain.

We’re celebrating by sharing the story of the humble trig pillar, still much loved by walkers today, and giving you the chance to join our celebrations with The Trig Pillar Trail Challenge. But what is the background to the trig pillar?

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16
Dec
2011
0

Celebrating the Hotine contribution

Amidst the joy of our Christmas celebrations this year, staff at Ordnance Survey will be remembering the contribution made to the national mapping agency by Brigadier Martin Hotine CMG CBE RE.

Brigadier Hotine served in the Royal Engineers for many years and saw active service in both the First and Second World Wars.  However, it was during 1934–1939 when he worked at Ordnance Survey heading up the catchily-titled ‘Trigonometrical and Levelling division’ when he made the contribution which we’ll be remembering.

Hotine was the person responsible for the design, planning and implementation of the re-triangulation of Great Britain on which Ordnance Survey maps are still based.  During this inter-war period, he designed the iconic and much-loved Trig Pillar which is still found now on many hilltops and in the countryside across Great Britain.

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18
Apr
2011
1

Happy birthday to the Trig Pillar – 75 years young today

On a clear, crisp spring morning in 1936, a group of men gathered around a strange, pale obelisk in the middle of an unremarkable field in Cold Ashby, Northamptonshire. Those men were there to begin the greatest undertaking Ordnance Survey had attempted since the early 19th century.

That shining white monolith would now be instantly recognised by any walker, hiker or geography pupil. It was of course a Trig Pillar, and today, 18 April, marks 75 years since the day when they were first used in anger at the beginning of the Retriangulation of Great Britain.

Where it all began - Cold Ashby

Where it all began – Cold Ashby

Trig Pillars now evoke the kind of sentimentalism of something quintessentially British (although there are equivalents in other countries), but at the time they were part of a state-of-the art network built to literally re-write the map of Britain. The Retriangulation was an enormous task and lasted up until 1962 (with a break for World War II), the impact of which we still live with today.

Triangulation is basically a mathematical process that makes accurate map making possible. It works by determining the location of a point by measuring angles to it from known points at either end of a fixed baseline and in this case, those known points were the 6,500 Trig Pillars erected across the country. In practice, a theodolite would have been secured to the top mounting plate and made level. It would then be directly over the brass bolt underneath the pillar. Angles were then measured from the pillar to other surrounding points. For the highest accuracy primary points in the Retriangulation, many rounds of angles would have been measured with the observations taking several hours.

But why was the Retriangulation needed?

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