Tag

vr

11
Jun
2019
1

Meet the team: Layla Gordon

Continuing our series to introduce you to the creative individuals within OS and share the variety of work we do, meet Layla Gordon. As a Research Scientist, here she gives us a glimpse into her extremely varied role…

How long have you worked for OS?

14 years. I first joined as a research scientist to work in the remote sensing team in the research department. After 7 years of working within research, I was asked to join the technology labs team as a tech labs engineer. I also joined the mobile team on a secondment basis for 6 months in between research and tech labs transition.

How long have you been in your current role?

About a year ago the tech labs team merged with the CATS team, so I became a research scientist again!

Can you describe your working day?

I am often on Meshmixer/Blender as well as meshlab for editing and the creation of 3D objects. Also I have two weekly meetings to attend with PocketPals and I also help manage the backlogs and communicate with the team throughout the day. Read More

16
Jan
2019
2

CityVerve virtual museum

Here at OS Labs, we’re presenting project work most days – by slide deck, report or a quick chat. But sometimes it needs to attract attention and create a buzz… like our virtual museum for CityVerve. We created a 3D interactive exhibition to mark the conclusion of CityVerve, the Manchester-based UK Internet of Things demonstrator project. Find out more…

The grand entrance to the CityVerve Virtual Museum.

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3
Jan
2018
8

A virtual escape into mapping

Over the past months, the OS Labs team has been busy developing a GIS based educational game experience using the Oculus Rift virtual reality system.  The project is one element in a wider project that is exploring how both virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) can be used to present geospatial data in new and stimulating ways.  Read on for a little background on the project… 

Virtual reality, as a concept, has existed for many years. The first functional VR headset was built in the sixties, yet long before that, science fiction authors had already been daring to imagine such worlds.   The early 90s saw consumer-orientated VR products being developed, marketed and, in some cases, actually released for sale. However, that technology couldn’t meet people’s expectations, leaving many disillusioned.  More recent advancements in technology have put it back on the agenda. There is already a broad range of VR kit available for purchase, with more lined up for release in 2018. So, how might this relate to Ordnance Survey?  With a sense of ‘place’ being a key component in VR, it seems that there is some common ground to explore. Read More