Working Internationally

Posted by: Steven Ramage

SkylineOver the last 20 years I’ve worked with Ordnance Survey as a partner, supplier and collaborator through various roles. In August 2012 I eventually became an employee, joining to create the new overseas business of Ordnance Survey International. The last couple of years have flown past and when I look back at what I started with just myself and Carsten Roensdorf, who is based out in Dubai, I have to say it has been an exciting ride.

Ordnance Survey International is now a good-sized team, working with organisations in various parts of the world and everyday facing interesting and challenging business demands. We set out with the initial goal of advising other nations of the value of geographic information and to help them understand how to build on this. Ordnance Survey has invested extensively over the last 12-15 years, learning many lessons along the way, and our role is to share those lessons and provide guidance to assist other nations to develop their capabilities quickly and sustainably.

One of those lessons is international geospatial standards. The most advanced mapping organisations promote, support and endorse the use of international geospatial standards, which allow interoperability of geospatial information, devices, applications, services and networks. Ordnance Survey makes an important contribution to international geospatial standards, the recent paper co-authored by myself and Gerardo Esparza from INEGI Mexico: http://ggim.un.org/docs/meetings/GGIM4/National%20Mapping%20Authority%20Perspective%20-%20International%20Geospatial%20Standards.pdf provides detail on the importance of geospatial standards from the national mapping perspective.

In addition to international geospatial standards development, Ordnance Survey International provides advice on business planning, policy development, pricing and licensing and technology acquisition – based on the real progress Ordnance Survey has made in these areas.

Our ability to guide nations in developing their own national mapping capability through alignment of business strategy and vision and addressing operational capacity and capability enforces Ordnance Survey as a very well-respected and high-quality brand, not only in Great Britain, but throughout the world.

How do you make sense of the disparate, exponential explosion of data?

The city of LondonHarnessing the power of big data presents businesses with a phenomenal business opportunity. The question is, are they ready for it? McKinsey in their recent report on big data, assert that it will become a key basis of competition, underpinning new waves of productivity growth, innovation, and consumer surplus, with personal navigation data alone being worth $800bn worldwide during the current decade. The business value to be derived from big data comes from finding new insights, what is termed predictive analytics, and the process efficiencies that flow from using new tools and techniques for information management, manipulation and visualisation.

At its simplest level, big data refers to a mass of information held digitally, that is so large, making it difficult to analyse, search and process. Businesses already hold vast amounts of data, but now they can gather even more from new sources such as GPS-enabled devices, social media postings and CCTV footage.  Continue reading “How do you make sense of the disparate, exponential explosion of data?”

Launching the GeoVation Housing Challenge

We’ve teamed up with Land Registry to launch the latest GeoVation Challenge ‘How can we enable people in Britain to live in better places?’

We are offering £101,000 in funding to the best ventures that address the problems of long term housing issues that we’ve identified, using  our established Problem Pow Wow methodology, in four key themes:

Affordability; Availability; Access and Infrastructure; Assets (best use of).

Watch the video below to find out more:

Continue reading “Launching the GeoVation Housing Challenge”

How to build a winning raft

RaftBuilding a raft can be a challenging, fun and rewarding activity, whether you’re creating one as part of a team-building activity or just simply want one to trek down a local river in. You can either create one with your mates or ask your family to lend a hand.

Perhaps you’ll spend your time on the raft aimlessly floating downstream or maybe you’ll use the opportunity to do a spot of fishing. Either way, here’s how to build a winning raft: Continue reading “How to build a winning raft”

Have you entered the AGI Awards yet?

AGI Awards imageWith just under a month until the deadline (30 September 2014), there is still time to submit your entry to the AGI’s prestigious annual awards ceremony recognising the very best achievements in the field of Geographic Information throughout the year. This year sees a new format and ten new awards showcasing high impact projects, innovation and commitment to the GI industry and in GI Education.

Along with Ordnance Survey, other key industry players such as ESRI, 1spatial, Informed Solutions and GIStandards are sponsoring awards to help recognise excellence, innovation and best practice within the sector.

Ordnance Survey is delighted to be sponsoring the AGI Award for the Best Use of Geospatial for Business Benefit and we are looking forward to seeing entries illustrating how geospatial has become a core tool in the business arena helping to improve decision making, making cost savings and support efficiencies. With this award, we hope that examples of geospatial being used as a mainstream business tool to deliver intelligence can lead the way for future business and economic growth. Continue reading “Have you entered the AGI Awards yet?”

Route of the week: Mike Cuming’s Swynerton Run

Mike-CumingAs official mapping partner for the 2014 Friends Life Tour of Britain we’re thrilled to be supporting the race and will be at the Liverpool, Brighton and London stages if you want to pop by and see us. We’re also extremely excited to be able to bring you a series of recommended rides from the Rapha Condor JLT team. Ranging from 100–200km, from Skipton to Bodmin, there should be routes to suit many cyclists.

Download the GPX file

Mike Cuming is one of Rapha Condor JLT’s quiet achievers, taking at least one major win a year since coming to the team in 2012. Cuming first made people take note when he won the U23 National Road Race Championships in 2012; before he went on to take his biggest success winning the overall at the Tour of Korea in 2013. Continue reading “Route of the week: Mike Cuming’s Swynerton Run”

Proposed changes to latitude and longitude representation on paper maps – tell us your thoughts

We’re considering changing the overlay showing latitude and longitude markers on Ordnance Survey paper maps. This would mean moving towards the overlay showing latitude and longitude used on GPS devices, to help bring digital navigation devices and paper maps closer together and work more in harmony. We believe this would have little impact on the majority of users of our paper maps; however, we would like your opinions on this change to ensure we fully consider all options and impacts before we make a final decision.

We’d like you to read the information below, and, if you would like to share your thoughts on how this would affect you, complete our short survey by Friday 3 October.

Continue reading “Proposed changes to latitude and longitude representation on paper maps – tell us your thoughts”

ResilienceDirect – making the UK a safer place

ResilienceDirect-lauraResilienceDirect™ is making fantastic strides in the emergency response service arena. It has been created specifically for “blue light” responders along with their public and private sector planning and response partners.

Luana Avagliano (pictured right), Head of the ResilienceDirect team in the Civil Contingencies Secretariat – Cabinet Office explains about the role of ResilienceDirect, “It’s quite simply to make the UK a safer place. ResilienceDirect is the UK’s secure platform for multi-agency partnerships to share information in both emergency response and in planning. It is essential that the Resilience Community have the best tools and services to support them in effective decision-making at the tactical and strategic levels”. Continue reading “ResilienceDirect – making the UK a safer place”

Occupy your mind during long-distance exercise

RunningWhen out walking, running or cycling, many people like to immerse themselves in music. Whether as a source of entertainment, a way of distracting themselves from the aches and pains or a combination of the two, music is a popular choice. For some, however, music is too much of a distraction, putting them at unnecessary risks or taking away from the rare solitude that long distance sports can offer.

For those in the latter camp, walking, running or cycling is as much about the inward contemplation as it is the activity itself. The long distance runner, for example, is well known as a solitary figure. So as the miles fall away and minutes turn to hours, what do the silent types actually think of? Continue reading “Occupy your mind during long-distance exercise”

Route of the week: Chris Opie’s Cornish 200 km

OpieAs official mapping partner for the 2014 Friends Life Tour of Britain we’re thrilled to be supporting the race and will be at the Liverpool, Brighton and London stages if you want to pop by and see us. We’re also extremely excited to be able to bring you a series of recommended rides from the Rapha Condor JLT team. Ranging from 100–200km, from Skipton to Bodmin, there should be routes to suit many cyclists.

Download the GPX file

Chris Opie is one of the fastest finishing riders in the UK, and he is also the most South Westerly located rider in the domestic peloton. Haling from Truro in Cornwall, where he lives with his partner and son, Opie no doubt has the longest commute of anyone to get to races in the UK, but the 27 year-old is happy to spend the extra time travelling to races if it means that he can train on his home roads in Cornwall. Continue reading “Route of the week: Chris Opie’s Cornish 200 km”