21
May
2019
0

OGC CityGML Hackathon

If you’re a developer working with urban 3D data, you won’t want to miss this event! Organised by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), you are invited to the OGC CityGML Hackathon in London.

Hosted by us on 11 & 12 June 2019 at the Geovation Hub in London, we will be providing a wealth of 3D city model source data to be transformed into CityGML 3.0. This will include 3D data created for the CityVerve project in Manchester.

An OGC Hackathon is a collaborative and inclusive event driven by innovative and rapid programming with minimum process and organisation constraints to support the development of new applications and open standards. Drawing on the outcomes of the OGC’s CityGML Standards Working Group, the hackathon will allow participants detailed insight about the current plans for CityGML. Please note the hackathon is open to anyone – OGC membership is not a requirement!

Agenda

First issued in 2008, CityGML is a well-established and implemented OGC standard. In this hackathon, participants will experiment with and validate the current draft conceptual model for the upcoming version 3.0 of CityGML. This can either be done with source data that participants bring to hackathon themselves or with source data made available by Ordnance Survey and other data sponsors such as CityGML 2 files, mesh models and Building Information Models. Ideally, participants should have some knowledge of CityGML / OGC Geography Markup Language (GML), 3D modelling or city modelling. Read More

16
May
2019
2

OS GitHub page has an overhaul

If you’re a user of OS data, you may well have explored our GitHub page. For those unfamiliar with GitHub, it is a web portal where the 28 million users primarily share code and engage at a technical level. GitHub has been adopted by a large number or commercial and public sector organisations, so we jumped at the chance to create a page and work closer with users of our products.

Having been active on GitHub for a while now, we’ve been able to receive feedback from OS partners and other users (including those who were at our technical showcase event). From this, we’ve recognised there was a lack of navigation on the page that made it tricky to locate content. Read More

15
May
2019
2

OS Moon map celebrates 50th anniversary of the Moon landing

This year marks the 50th year anniversary of the Moon landing, and to celebrate the occasion the OS GeoDataViz team decided to create a map of Apollo 11’s lunar landing site in our unique map style (available to buy in our OS map shop). Find out how Paul Naylor approached the task.

OS moon map

On 20 July 1969 at 20:17 GMT, Apollo 11 touched down on the moon. Six hours later Neil Armstrong became the first person to step onto the lunar surface. It was a monumental achievement for humanity.

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10
May
2019
2

Excellence in Cartography: OS Open Zoomstack scoops award

We were delighted to have two entries shortlisted for the inaugural Geography in Government Awards this year. We were even more pleased to win one as OS Open Zoomstack scooped the prize for ‘Excellence in geo-visualisation and cartography’, up against tough competition from the Defence Geographic Centre (DGC).

Some of the OS team attended the awards ceremony on 25 April at Scotland House in London and enjoyed a great evening which celebrated the best of geography across Government. OS Open Zoomstack is our latest open data product which we launched in January after a successful trial throughout summer 2018. For this award we owe a huge thank you to everyone who took part in the trial and made this product a success. Without your feedback and support it wouldn’t have been possible.

OS team collecting the award for OS Open Zoomstack

Accepting the award

What’s happened since the launch?

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9
May
2019
3

Why we’re adjusting Naismith’s Rule

Guest blog by OS product manager Tim Newman.

If you’ve spent any time hillwalking or learning basic navigation skills, then chances are you’ve heard of Naismith and his eponymous rule for estimating walking times. It enables you, armed only with a paper map and a piece of string, to predict your route time or assess whether you’re quicker heading straight over a hill, or taking a longer detour round it.

Naismith’s Rule

Imperial  Metric
Allow one hour for every three miles walked. 

Add one hour for every 2000 ft of ascent. 

Allow one hour for every five kilometres walked. 

Add one hour for every 600 metres of ascent. 


Despite
a number of corrections that have been proposed over the years (e.g. to take into account fitness or slope gradient), Naismith’s Rule has remained a staple on navigation syllabi across the country and is still used by our digital mapping product OS Maps. Read More

7
May
2019
0

Meet the team: Marianne Pope

Continuing our series to introduce you to the wonderful individuals within OS and give you a snapshot of the variety of work we do, meet Marianne Pope. As a Product Manager, here she offers insight into her role from data to the Geospatial Commission… 

How long have you worked for OS?

I joined OS in November 2018 as a product manager within OSGB. Before that I worked as a product manager in the education sector. 

What does your role involve?

As a product manager, my main job is to set the vision for a product. The vision sets out the ‘why’ behind what we do and makes sure everyone is working towards the same goal. From the vision I draw up the roadmap and strategy for the product’s development while ensuring I balance the needs of our users with the needs of the business. I also spend a lot of time analysing data and carrying out user research to constantly measure product progress – this makes sure we stay on track towards our goals. Read More

2
May
2019
0

EA & SEPA support OS MasterMap Water Network – how does this benefit you?

Following the press release on OS MasterMap Water Network, Product Manager Jessica Gaskell discusses the product further in this guest blog…

As the first comprehensive, single dataset covering Great Britain’s watercourses, I am delighted to say that OS MasterMap Water Network has now become a full product!

The OS MasterMap Water Network product means the data on all the watercourses in GB will be in one place. It is a nationally consistent, topologically structured data of all GB’s watercourses. It identifies how our watercourses interact with each other through the detailed scale of mapping, direction of flow and the primary flow channels alongside giving key information into the characteristics of the watercourse including name, catchment information, gradient and width (to name a few!). Read More

30
Apr
2019
1

Understanding Scottish Places with OS data

The Understanding Scottish Places (USP) platform launched in April 2015, offering a way of understanding the similarity of places across Scotland. The tool contains a range of demographic, social and economic data on all 479 Scottish settlements with a population of over 1,000 people. Deliberately designed to avoid a simplistic ranking of places as better or worse, USP focuses on the shared characteristics of towns.


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