28
Sep
2016
0

Mapping Benali’s Big Race

On Sunday 2 October, Southampton FC legend Francis Benali starts his challenge to run and cycle to every English League Premier and Championship club. Franny is building on his 2014 challenge, where he visited the 20 Premier League football grounds, by running 50 miles a day for three weeks and raising over £265,000 for Cancer Research UK.

BIGRUN-26

Photo courtesy of Benali’s Big Run

This year he plans to go one better and to break the £1 million barrier for Cancer Research UK with his challenge:

  • 44 stadiums in 15 days.
  • 100 miles per day.
  • 26 miles running and the rest cycling.

How are OS involved in Benali’s Big Race?

Read More

26
Sep
2016
0

Join the Geovation Challenge launch on 12 October

We are excited to announce that our 10th Geovation Challenge will focus on our underground assets.  The Challenge ‘How can we better manage underground assets in Britain?’ recognises successful innovation depends on developing innovative solutions to real problems.  The challenge opens for entries on 19 October, 2016 with the focus on using geographical data and design thinking to address the problems associated with underground asset location, management, impacts on stakeholders and predicting asset future.

challenge 672x372

To help you understand the Challenge focus, how to enter, timescales and the benefits should you win, we are holding a launch event at the Geovation Hub on 12 October from 4pm to 7pm. Read More

21
Sep
2016
1

National Map Reading Week coming in October

logo-small-landscapeHands up if you’d like a chance to top up your navigation skills! For the first time we’re holding a National Map Reading Week to help you stay safe when you #GetOutside. From 17-23 October, we’ll be hosting free map reading workshops and will have some fantastic resources, from videos to handy guides, readily available on our site.

Why are we holding a National Map Reading Week?

We always want you to stay safe when you’re out and about exploring Britain, but news stories over the summer talking about an increase in Mountain Rescue callouts started us thinking. While we still sell 1.9 million paper maps each year, we know more and more people rely on GPS devices and apps to navigate, we even have our own app, OS Maps. But – for safety reasons, we would always recommend carrying a paper map, a compass, and knowing how to navigate. It really could be a life-saver. Read More

19
Sep
2016
1

Mapping on the Edge

After months of planning the British Cartographic Society (BCS) and the Society of Cartographers (SoC) joint conference finally took place this month. Through my new role as program chair to the BCS it’s my role to organise and deliver the conference. No pressure then. Paul Naylor, Carto Design team.

Called Mapping on the Edge, the event promised an inspirational collection of presentations and workshops, the annual BCS awards ceremony and a corporate members exhibition. As sponsors, we were bold in our presence at the exhibition, displaying OS Maps using our impressive collection of trig pillars.

BCS

Mapping the Edge 2016. Photo by Martin Lubikowski

Events got underway with a free full-day workshop hosted and sponsored by ESRI. The workshop, Better Mapping with ArcGIS was hosted by and Ken Field from ESRI with a focus on how to create high quality cartography within ArcGIS. Ken also looked at how to get the best out of ArcGIS Desktop and Online, as well as some of the new tool and technique offerings such as vector tiles and 3D. Read More

15
Sep
2016
3

Where does blockchain sit in the geospatial world?

By Rollo Home, Strategic Product Manager

For 225 years we’ve worked with governments, private industry, and individuals alike, since the data we produce touches and connects the lives of everyone in the country. We know the location of every road, water network, mast, residential and commercial address and the type of terrain, plus much more. And this data is invaluable for identifying areas of risk, to improve planning and services and more. Put simply location is the glue that holds disparate pieces of information together in a single logical view of the world.

Traditionally this information has been shared with people in the form of a (digital) map, but the world moves on and we’re preparing for a new ‘data driven’ future where machines rather than people will be the primary consumers of our data. Rather than a person querying the data for some form of insight, it could mean in simplistic terms, a computer running some route optimisation analysis, based on a trigger from a sensor (Internet of Things (IoT)) measuring traffic and/or customer demand, for which it would retrieve the necessary data from an OS server. This means restructuring our data around explicit references to objects. The map will remain, but simply as a derivative representation of the data. Data will be king. And that requires a new way to deliver data.

The University of Manchester shown in the emerging 3D context model based on point clouds derived from aerial photography

The University of Manchester shown in the emerging 3D context model based on point clouds derived from aerial photography – delivering digital data to people rather than machines

Read More

13
Sep
2016
0

Bringing Run An Empire to life

We blogged recently about a new app from former Geovation winners Run An Empire. Find out more about them in their guest blog by Sam Hill.

It was back in 2014 when I first walked into the shiny atrium of the Ordnance Survey head office. My team and I had caught several trains from East London to Southampton, we had dropped our things off at the nearby Holiday Inn, and we were eagerly gearing up for the weekend-long hackathon.

We had in the last week learned that we’d been shortlisted from 74 entries to be one of the dozen finalists for Geovation’s latest innovation challenge – “How Can We Encourage Active Lifestyles in Britain?”

Hero_Image_01_Copy_A_Web

Read More

12
Sep
2016
0

OSTN15 – the new geoid for Britain

Seeing as an improvement in our model that transforms height from GPS to one above mean sea level has caused a hill to “grow” into a mountain – we thought it would be a good idea to explain how positions and heights surveyed by our surveyors with GPS make it onto our maps.

OS surveyor

OS surveyor

All positioning and surveying, not just that from GPS, has to take place on a mathematically simplified model of the surface of the Earth. The surface that the model attempts to emulate is called the geoid.  The geoid is a complex concept, but can be imagined as a hypothetical surface that would be formed if the water in the oceans, close to mean sea level, continued under the land and was only influenced by Earth’s gravity field. This surface is one we already refer to without perhaps thinking about it – we say oceans have “depth” (below the arbitrary zero height surface) and mountains have “height” (above the surface). The geoid is a complex shape since it is influenced by varying Earth gravity. It is too complex to act as our surface for the calculations involved in positioning and surveying, so we need to fit a simple model shape to it. Read More

8
Sep
2016
1

Calf Top – England’s last mountain

Guest blog by Myrddyn Phillips, Hill Data & Mountain Surveys 

Calf Top (SD 664 856) is a rather unassuming hill which is approximately 6km south of Sedbergh in the Yorkshire Dales.  It rises above the deep cleft of Barbondale to its east and Dentdale to its north, and although not the highest hill in the area it is quite prominent above its surroundings.

Calf Top

Calf Top

However, it isn’t the hill’s prominence that is of interest, it is its height, and being a mountain surveyor those hills that are given a 609m spot height on Ordnance Survey maps are particularly interesting, as this height equates to just under 2,000ft, with 609.6m the metric equivalent of this all important imperial height.  All important, as 2,000ft is generally regarded as the benchmark height in England and in Wales for when a hill is promoted to the dizzying ranks of a mountain. Read More

1 2 3 158