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box hill

21
Aug
2013
0

Walk of the week: Box Hill, Surrey

Length of route:
2¾ miles (3½ km)
Starting point:
National Trust shop: TQ178513
Postcode for sat nav: KT20 7LB

Suitable for:
Walking
Maps: 
OS Explorer Map – Dorking, Box Hill & Reigate 146
Download our OS MapFinder app and record your route
Use OS getamap

Contact details:
Telephone 01306 885502
Email boxhill@nationaltrust.org.uk

A view that stretches for 26 miles. That is a pretty impressive statement, one that can only really be confirmed if you have seen and marvelled at it yourself. Aged 11, sat on Boxhill, I spent a whole hour watching the planes at Gatwick take off with hypnotic regularity whilst basking in the sun surrounded by wild flowers and butterflies. An affection for the beautiful British countryside started that day!

Box Hill on a clear day is glorious and very much worth the steep climb to the viewpoint. There are plenty of routes to investigate and many pre-exsisting trails, this one covers bits of each, so if you do want to explore it further ensure you take a map and compass to keep yourself on track. This walk is full of steep climbs and descensions, so a good strudy pair of walking boots should be worn on this venture. Also remember to take some change as parking is pay and display, £3.50 per day.

The National Trust provides fantastic facilities including a café offering food, gifts, toilets and an interactive learning section. Once the walk is complete I like to reward myself with one of their delicious afternoon teas.

It is at the café that you will start and follow the signs up to Salomon’s Memorial which is the main viewing platform. From this point you can see from Dorking right across to the South Downs. If it is very clear you will be lucky enough to see Devil’s Dyke based in Sussex. It really is spectacular so make sure you have that camera to hand! You may recognise a lot of the landscape if you watched a lot of last years London 2012 Olympics as it was used as part of the route for the cycling road race events.

Next to this viewpoint are some steps down to a track, head right and keep going until you pass through a wooded area and emerge in to a clearing. As you look out to your left you will see 12 large concrete obelisks by the bank of the River Mole, walk down the hill in the direction of them. Follow the signs for the North Downs Way through the trees and down the steps on your left. Then look out for signs for the Riverside Walk whilst walking down the hill and follow them to view the obelisks.

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10
Jul
2013
0

Walk of the week: Bere Regis loop including Turners Puddle and Kite Hill Plantation

Length of route:
Approx 5 miles, allow 2 hours.
Starting point:
SY846947 (free car park).
Suitable for:
Walking
Maps:
OS Explorer Map (1:25 000) – 117 Cerne Abbas & Bere Regis

Download our OS MapFinder app and record the route

This is a lovely walk through the Dorset countryside, starting in the old village of Bere Regis, mentioned in the Domesday Book. The village is signposted from the A35 and the car park is signposted as you head into the village. Parking is free, although the car park can get busy.

When you reach a gate, pass through and continue straight ahead, climbing more steeply through the trees. At the top, you’ll reach a more defined path and follow it through the gorseland and trees. At this point, although you’re high up on Black Hill, during the summer, you won’t have spectacular views due to the height of the bushes and trees. You may be lucky enough to spot some lovely wildflowers along the way though.Turn left out of the car park at Bere Regis and head down to the end of the road, crossing over and joining the path through the trees. Follow the boardwalk over the water and keep on the path, turning left just before you reach the houses. At the end of the houses, turn right onto the road and then follow  the path in front of you, starting to climb up hill.

When you reach a crossroads on the path, continue ahead and you’ll start to descend, eventually reaching a gate. Pass through and continue until you see another gate which would take you into a farm. Follow the sign-posted path right here and you will skirt around the edge of the farm. Turn right when you reach the road into Turners Puddle.

The lovely Piddle Valley

Continue along here until you reach a well-defined right turn heading up to woodland between two fields. Fork slightly left just before the quarry and continue into the woods and the Kite Hill Plantation. If you’re lucky, you may well spot deer in this area. Continue on the path following round and slightly uphill until it widens and continue towards the right on the wide path.

When you reach a signposted bridleway to the right you can either turn right and cut off the corner, or continue straight on, taking you downhill, until you reach another path. Turn right here instead and you will head back uphill to meet the bridleway.

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30
Dec
2013
0

Top ten walks in 2013

If you find you’ve eaten too much over the festive period, you could always get out and enjoy the beautiful British countryside and stretch your legs with friends and family. We usually publish a walk of the week on Wednesdays throughout the year covering town and county areas across Great Britain. We’ve just looked back at 2013 and found the top ten walks you’ve enjoyed reading about and trying out. See if any of these inspire you:

1. Fritham, New Forest: There are countless walks you can try around the lovely New Forest, but this one offers some woodland views, covers a typical New Forest plain, offers the chance of some deer and pony spotting – and starts and ends near The Royal Oak pub. What more could you ask for?

FrithamLoop

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10
Apr
2017
1

Parallel – working with OS OpenData

We’re celebrating seven years of OS OpenData, and its success is down to the people and businesses using the products. We are always interested in hearing how open data is being used, so please keep sharing your examples with us. One business who we have spotted using our data regularly over the years is Parallel. We asked Ashley Clough, founder of Parallel to explain how OS OpenData has benefitted them.

Parallel has evolved to specialise in data-visualisation and mapping, particularly for healthcare data in and around the NHS. We started to use OS OpenData when we became frustrated by the styling of available basemaps for website applications. We needed a set of maps that were optimised for the presentation of data overlays; as icons for point locations and polygons for area indications. We needed to control what was visible on the map at every zoom level and crucially we needed to ensure that the level of detail was consistent across the entirety of Great Britain. We investigated using open source map data but we couldn’t rely on the consistency of data within urban locations, and particularly in more rural locations. As the maps are used within the NHS we needed to ensure that everywhere had the same quality of data; OS OpenData was, and we believe still is, the most consistent for our purpose.

Parallel 3D buildings and functional sites

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15
Mar
2017
2

7 fantastic things about #TrigPillar80

When we decided to celebrate the 80th anniversary of the trig pillar last year, we had no idea how strongly so many of you felt about the (mostly) concrete pillars dotted around Britain. We’ve had over 1,200 Instagram posts, uncovered dozens of trig baggers, seen Rob Woodall complete his 13-year mission to bag all 6,190 and had hundreds of people, magazines and websites share stories throughout the year.

With 18 April fast-approaching, #TrigPillar80 is drawing to a close, and #TrigPillar81 doesn’t have quite the same ring to it. So, huge thanks to everyone who took part and keep sharing your trig pillar love with us. Here are 7 fantastic things about trig pillars in case you missed all of the celebrations this year: Read More

29
Dec
2016
0

Top walking destinations for 2016 unveiled

Looking ahead to New Year’s Resolutions for 2017? Trying to decide how to work off those Christmas calories? How about walking? Getting outside and walking in Britain is free, easy and accessible to most of us.

Where will you explore? OS Maps mobile - photo by #GetOutside champion Aleks Kashefi

Where will you explore? OS Maps mobile – photo by #GetOutside champion Aleks Kashefi

We’ve already seen 2016 prove to be a big year for the outdoor enthusiast with the nation either donning their running shoes or walking boots to #GetOutside.

With the year coming to an end we’ve taken a look back at the most popular destinations searched by walkers on our popular OS Maps online service. An amazing 1.4 million destination searches were carried out via our online version of OS Maps in 2016. So, where were people hoping to explore?

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22
Dec
2016
0

Five mappy craft ideas

It has to be said, we do love seeing inventive ideas for old maps. It’s sacrilege to some, but old maps can be cut up for a whole range of different arts and craft uses. We’ve seen some brilliant uses recently on Instagram and thought we’d share our favourite five with you.

1. Christmas crafts

I’m sure we all love a mappy paper chain, but @sevarina took map Christmas decorations to a whole new level. Combining origami skills with some festive fairy lights to create a really personal Christmas decoration. Just make sure they’re not too close to the bulb if you try this at home.

2. Framed map prints

A lovely idea to highlight a place that is personal to you. Cut out an area you love, and box-frame it. Good for a first wedding anniversary too!

3. Mappy pets

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1
Dec
2016
0

Top 5 mappy Christmas gifts

It’s December, so we feel safe mentioning the ‘C’ word and sharing our 5 favourite Christmas gifts for the map lover in your life. Grab some inspiration here:

1. The Great British Colouring Map: A Colouring Journey Around Britain

CBRelax this Christmas and take an immersive colouring trip across the country, from coasts and forests to our iconic cities and landmarks. The latest addition to the colouring-in craze puts the intricate detail our maps on the page, ready for you either restore them to their original colour scheme – or add your own abstract creative touch! Practice some mindfulness and colour in or simply pore over the maps: https://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/shop/great-british-colouring-book.html

2. OS Custom Made

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then one of our Custom Made maps tells a story. You can put your memories – where you were born, where you met, where you live –at the centre of one of our maps. You can choose a folded map at OS Explorer or OS Landranger map scale, add your own photo and title and centre it wherever you like. Or pick a unique flat map that can be framed and hung on the wall – still with your own title and centred where you choose. For the first time this year, we’re also offering a canvas version for you to hang on your wall. Custom Made map prices start at £16.99, take a look: https://www.ordnancesurvey.co.uk/shop/custom-made-maps.html

3. OS clothing collection

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4
Jul
2016
3

Recreating historic maps: interview with Charley Glynn

We recently celebrated our 225th anniversary and shared with you two new maps created by our Cartographic Design team. Chris and Charley took inspiration from map styles in our history and used current OS data to recreate the look and feel. Charley chose a 1960s map of the Western Highlands of Scotland. We catch up with him to find out how he went about the challenge.

Charley's map

Charley’s map

Tell us about the map era that you chose Read More

27
Apr
2016
1

#TrigPillar80 winners picked

First things first, a massive thank you to everyone who has joined in with our #TrigPillar80 celebrations over the last week or so. We’ve been thrilled that so many of you share our loved and appreciation for the trig pillar, and particularly with the hundreds of people who have shared their favourite trig pillar photos with us on Twitter and Instagram so far.

If you missed it last week, catch up on our celebrations, find out about the inner workings of a trig pillar, read about how we survey today, meet Britain’s top trig-bagger, and try out some trig pillar routes recommended by our #GetOutside champions.

But now it’s time to announce the first four winners of our #TrigPillar80 T-shirts…

Week eighteen #TrigPillar80 T-shirt winners – 22/08/16

Trig pillar on Carreg Yr Ogof with Garreg Las in the background #trigpillar80 #ordnancesurvey

A photo posted by @skyrunner1982 on

Week seventeen #TrigPillar80 T-shirt winners – 15/08/16

Week sixteen #TrigPillar80 T-shirt winners – 08/08/16

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